12 ROUNDS

Is Violence a Game?

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 27, 2009

Starring: John Cena. Aidan Gillen, Ashley Scott, Steve Harris, Brian J. White, Gonzalo Menendez

Genre: Police Thriller

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 108 minutes

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO of News Corp.
Peter Chernin, President/COO of The Fox Group
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen/CEO
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
(Fox Searchlight Pictures and Fox Atomic)
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(B, P, LL, VVV, S, A, M) A light moral worldview with American values about police combating evil; 11 obscenities and two profanities; considerable violence and threats of violence, several shootings, several explosions, and several chase scenes with damage done to people and property; there is no sexual activity shown but the hero lives with his girlfriend and a sexual relationship is implied; no nudity, but some outfits are skimpy; bar scene with some drinking but no drunkenness; no smoking or drug references; and, kidnapping, theft, blackmail, and deception (all condemned).

Summary:

In 12 ROUNDS John Cena plays Danny Fisher, a likable New Orleans policeman sucked into a violent game of survival by a brilliant, vindictive criminal. Despite the movie’s moral worldview, the level of violence demands extreme caution.

Review:

In 12 ROUNDS JohnCena plays Danny Fisher, a likable New Orleans policeman sucked into a violent game of survival by a brilliant, vindictive criminal.

The movie opens with the FBI in New Orleans setting up to capture Miles Jackson, a brilliant thug played well by Aidan Gillen. He again eludes them but is captured by Danny. Unfortunately, Miles’ girlfriend is killed in a car accident leading to the capture.

One year later Miles escapes from prison and seeks revenge on Danny, who has been promoted to detective. Miles blows up Danny’s new truck as well as his house and proceeds to kidnap Danny’s girlfriend Molly (Ashley Scott). Miles tells Danny he can get her back if he survives 12 rounds of a violent cat-and-mouse game. The game results in dangerous chases, explosions and killings.

This is the kind of movie where the scriptwriter creates a villain so ruthless and despicable that the audience enjoys seeing the hero engage in whatever violence it calls for to send the villain to his grave. Sadly, this genre is aging to the point that it takes more and more to create a satisfying villain and a high enough level of violence. To be honest, 12 ROUNDS was tame compared to the pitch given in three previews shown in the screening attended.

The United States of America is becoming a nation desensitized to extreme violence in our entertainment. We should be thankful that life in America is nothing like what is seen in so many of our movies. Sadly, in other countries people who see these movies don’t see how peaceful ordinary life in America really is.

The movie screen has become America’s Roman Coliseum where people fight to the death before our eyes. To keep the populace satisfied, studios are creating greater and greater violence spectacles. This was not healthy for Rome and it is not healthy for us.

While 12 ROUNDS is patriotic, in that the police are its heroes, it is nonetheless just an excuse to provide a violence fix. MOVIEGUIDE® recommends extreme caution because of the level of violence.

In Brief:

In 12 ROUNDS John Cena plays Danny Fisher, a likable New Orleans policeman sucked into a violent game of survival by a brilliant, vindictive escaped convict. The city of New Orleans is trashed as Danny attempts to last 12 rounds and save the life of his kidnapped girl friend. It doesn’t take a genius to note the title is 12 ROUNDS, not 5 ROUNDS. The movie would be thrilling if you’re one of the five people left on earth who’ve never seen a police thriller before. The twist is that the villain turns his battle with Danny into a game.

This is the kind of movie where the scriptwriter creates a villain so despicable you enjoy seeing the hero engage in whatever violence it calls for to send the villain to his grave. Sadly, this genre is aging to the point that it takes more and more to create a satisfying villain and a high enough level of violence. While 12 ROUNDS has a moral worldview where the police are the heroes, it is nonetheless just an excuse to provide a violence fix. MOVIEGUIDE® recommends extreme caution because of the violence level.