BEING HUMAN

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 06, 1994

Starring: Robin Williams, John Turturro,
Vincent D'Onofrio, & Anna
Galiena

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 116 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director: Bill Forsyth

Executive Producer:

Producer: David Putnam & Robert F.
Colesberry

Writer: Bill Forsyth

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, L, V, SS, E) Humanist/materialist worldview where there is no God and no hope beyond the current moment or outside one's own abilities; 7 obscenities & 2 exclamatory profanities; brief violence--man commits suicide, short sword battle & 2 men hanged; 2 instances of implied sexual intercourse, 1 instance of graphic sex, but participants fully clothed; and, brief adamant promotion of recycling & anti-meat viewpoint.

Summary:

Robin Williams plays five different men in five different eras, from cave-man to businessman, each one searching for meaning and purpose in life in the odd Warner Brothers drama BEING HUMAN. Don't look for humor or an uplifting message in this portrayal of a fatalist-humanist viewpoint where nothing exists outside of this moment, so don't think about it, just enjoy it...a feat not entirely possible while watching this depressing film.

Review:

Robin Williams plays five different men in five different eras, from cave-man to businessman, each one searching for meaning and purpose in life in the odd Warner Brothers drama BEING HUMAN. Don't look for humor or an uplifting message in this well-crafted, somewhat interesting but not exactly entertaining film. As a prehistoric cave-man named Hector, Williams loses his family to a tribe of foraging boat-men who take by force whatever they want or need. The final Hector is a New York businessman and divorced father who is nervous about seeing his children for the first time in years but realizes the need to get re-acquainted.

Robin Williams is quite good in his portrayal of Hector through the ages, managing to communicate a sense of selfishness inherent in mankind. Each segment portrays Hector as losing or leaving those he loves. Each "Hector" wants more out of life but seems unable to cast aside the very elements that prevent true happiness: selfishness and pride. Only in the last segment does he drop his fear, his pride and his selfish agenda and reach out with some honesty to his loved ones. His efforts pay off, but any hint of lasting improvement is uncertain due to the fatalist-humanist viewpoint espoused by the characters--nothing exists outside of this moment, so don't think about it, just enjoy it...a feat not entirely possible while watching this depressing film.

In Brief: