CHICAGO 10

Stop the Revolution! We Want To Get Off!

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 29, 2008

Starring: N/A

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Roadside Attractions

Director: Brett Morgen

Executive Producer: Bill Pohlad, Laura Bickford,
Jeff Skoll, Diane Weyermann,
Peter Schlessel, and Ricky
Strauss

Producer: Brett Morgen and Graydon
Carter

Writer: Brett Morgen

Address Comments To:

Howard Cohen and Eric d’Arbeloff
Co-President
Roadside Attractions
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Beverly Hills, CA 90212
Phone: (310) 789-4710
Fax: (310) 789-4711
Website: www.roadsideattractions.com
Email: dustins@roadsideattractions.com

Content:

(HHH, SoSoSo, APAPAP, AcapAcapAcap, RHRH, LLL, VV, S, A, DD, MM) Very strong humanist, socialist, anti-American worldview from a very strong anti-capitalist standpoint, with some anarchist leanings and strong revisionist history, especially a comment that Benjamin Franklin was a slaveholder when nothing could be further from the truth; at least 49 obscenities (most of them “f” words) and zero profanities; strong documentary images of riots with some people bleeding but mostly of police beating protestors with little or no footage of what the protesters may have been doing before being beaten; some brief sexual references; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking and some drug references; and, rebellion, mockery with the intent of inciting anger, flippant comments made to incite anger and violence, and protestors use insults for figures of authority, including police.

Summary:

CHICAGO 10 is a political documentary about the riots and marches during the 1968 Democrat Party Convention in Chicago and its aftermath at the height of the Vietnam War protests, told from the radical protestors’ humanist, socialist viewpoint. CHICAGO 10 also contains plenty of strong foul language, violent documentary footage and some drug references.

Review:

CHICAGO 10 is a political documentary about the riots and marches during the 1968 Democrat Party Convention in Chicago and their aftermath at the height of the Vietnam War protests, told from the protestors’ point of view. It hones in on the controversial trial of some of the radical male leaders of the demonstrations, who were accused of forming a conspiracy to incite people to riot. As the documentary notes, the trial convictions were all thrown out, including the contempt charges leveled by Judge Julius Hoffman against most of the defendants and their lawyers.

The movie starts by showing documentary footage of some of the leaders attending meetings about organizing demonstrations during the Convention. The problem is, after several riots in Chicago during the previous two years, Mayor John Daley decided to order the police to give the protestors virtually no leeway. Consequently, more than 100 protestors and more than 100 police officers suffered injuries during the clashes that followed.

Interspersed between the archival footage inside and outside the Convention is an animated re-enactment of some of the most volatile moments in the courtroom. Though based on actual transcripts, there are some inaccuracies, especially a three-day incident where the judge ordered one of the defendants, Bobby Seale, founder of the Black Panther Party, bound and gagged. Mr. Seale was actually at the screening MOVIEGUIDE® attended and told the press that his three-day ordeal was somewhat different than the way it was depicted in the movie. He also said the filmmakers did not consult him on their project.

Be that as it may, the disruptive attitude of some of the defendants, all of whom were anti-capitalist Communists, radical socialists or anarchists, is clear from the movie’s beginning. Even so, the filmmakers clearly side with the defendants and their protest movement, and against America’s free market, civil values. As later political conventions have shown, it is possible to hold a meaningful convention while accommodating the desires of thousands of protestors at the same time. We can’t help but feel that the flippant attitudes of the protestors before the convention even started deserves part of the blame for what happened. Certainly, both sides were riled up from the very beginning. Nowadays, of course, it is the campus radicals who won’t let Christians and conservatives speak.

In Brief:

CHICAGO 10 is a political documentary about the riots during the 1968 Democrat Party Convention in Chicago and its aftermath at the height of the Vietnam War protests, told from the protestors’ point of view. The movie starts by showing documentary footage of some of the leaders attending meetings about organizing demonstrations during the Convention. The problem is, after several riots in Chicago during the previous two years, Mayor John Daley decided to order the police to give the protestors virtually no leeway. Consequently, more than 100 protestors and more than 100 police officers suffered injuries during the clashes that followed. Interspersed between the archival footage inside and outside the Convention is an animated re-enactment of a trial where some of the male protestors were tried for a conspiracy to incite people to riot.

As the documentary notes, all of the convictions were thrown out later, and the defendants never re-tried. Even so, the disruptive attitude of some of the defendants, all of whom were anti-capitalist Communists, radical socialists or anarchists, is clear throughout this movie. Even so, the filmmakers clearly side with them and against America’s free market, civil society.