ELLA ENCHANTED Add To My Top 10

A Socialist Cinderella

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Release Date: April 09, 2004

Starring: Anne Hathaway, Hugh Dancy, Cary Elwes, Minnie Driver, Vivica A. Fox, and Joanna Lumley

Genre: Fantasy

Audience: Children and teenagers

Rating: PG for some crude humor and
language

Runtime: 94 minutes

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
Miramax Films
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (323) 822-4100 and (212) 941-3800
Fax: (212) 941-3846
Website: www.miramax.com

Content:

(Ro, O, ACapACap, PC, So, B, L, V, A, M) Romantic worldview that instructs you to “look to yourself” for answers and that presents romantic love as the apex of living, with magical occult spells by fairies, and an overt anti-capitalist socialist message that targets business, privatization, and the wealthy, and preaches politically correct, socialist egalitarianism, as well as love and moral conscience eventually overcome evil occult spell; one light obscenity (butt) and one light profanity, with some bullying from older sisters; light action and slapstick violence includes ogres throw rocks at an elf, attempted poisoning, fighting, pratfalls, and soldiers of evil king scuffle with the good prince; no sex scenes, some kissing; no nudity; giants drink alcohol in a bar; no smoking; and, father says he is marrying for money, adults lie about child’s whereabouts, older sisters force younger sister to shoplift and frequently manipulate her, girls disrespect political leaders, evil king tries to force girl to commit murder.

GENRE: Fantasy

Summary:

ELLA ENCHANTED is a retelling of the Cinderella story that, although it has great potential to be involving and interesting for children, spends more time advancing a socialist political message than entertaining them. Anne Hathaway is the movie’s saving grace, but there is not enough there to entertain young children.

Review:

ELLA ENCHANTED is a retelling of the Cinderella story. It has great potential to be involving and interesting for children but spends more time advancing an anti-capitalist, socialist political message than entertaining. Once the story kicks into high gear, the movie becomes very grim: the uncle is revealed to be a murderer, and the heroine is nearly forced to kill her love, the young prince. In the end, its messages become confused, and the story ends in a surprisingly conventional way.

The movie opens with Ella’s irresponsible fairy godmother casting an obedience spell on her. Whenever anyone tells her to do something, she does it immediately. This presents a problem when Ella’s mother dies and her father remarries. Unhappily for Ella, her new stepmother comes with two bratty stepsisters who soon learn the secret of controlling her. Ella sets out to find her fairy godmother and get the spell reversed, but she becomes entangled in a plot by Prince Char’s evil uncle to kill the prince and seize the throne.

What works for this movie is Anne Hathaway. As Ella, she acts with an effortlessness that never seems lazy or stagey. He character comes across as natural and very likeable. She is always believable, even when the script disservices her with simply standard material.

Although the story is set in the days of carriages and castles, the characters speak as if they are contemporary, and many of the cultural and political conflicts will be recognizeable to today’s audiences. This uniquely postmodern trick allows the familiar premise – young girl is abused by her stepsisters and stepmother until she accidentally seduces the prince and escapes their bondage – to become a political allegory. The movie seems most concerned with race and class (ogres, giants, and elves represent various minorities), but there are slight suggestions of a feminist message, although it is totally reversed in the movie’s denouement.

The movie advances its political messages by painting Ella as a dissenter. She stages rallies and protests and frequently cites her political beliefs, which, translated from the metaphor, are socialist-leaning. Ella is also backbendingly kind and likeable (aside from the fact that she is accommodating, which she cannot avoid due to a spell cast on her). On the other hand, Ella’s stepsisters love the corrupt king and the policies that Ella thinks unjust. They are also greedy and shallow. These characters morph into caricatures, with Ella representing “progressiveness” and her stepsisters representing organized greed.

Political messages choke the movie and make it hard to enjoy on other levels. By the movie’s final fifth, however, the story turns rather conventional, as Ella and the prince’s love triumphs over the evil king, and the two live “happily ever after.”

In Brief:

ELLA ENCHANTED is a retelling of the Cinderella story. The movie opens with Ella’s irresponsible fairy godmother casting an obedience sell on her. Whenever anyone tells her to do something, she does it immediately. This presents a problem when Ella’s mother dies and her father remarries. Unhappily for Ella, her new stepmother comes with two bratty stepsisters, who soon learn the secret of controlling her. Ella sets out to find her fairy godmother and get the spell reversed, but she becomes entangled in a plot by Prince Char’s evil uncle to kill the prince and seize the throne.

ELLA ENCHANTED had great potential to be involving and interesting for children, but spends more time advancing a socialist political message than entertaining them. Once the story kicks into high gear, it becomes very grim – the uncle is revealed to be a murderer, and the heroine is nearly forced to kill her love, the young prince. What works for the film is Anne Hathaway, the star of THE PRINCESS DIARIES. As Ella, she comes across as natural and very likeable. What doesn’t work are the anti-capitalist, politically correct, socialist messages embedded in the story.