HEAD OF STATE

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 28, 2003

Starring: Chris Rock, Bernie Mac, Tamala Jones, Lynn Whitfield, Dylan Baker, Jude Ciccolella, Robin Givens, Stephanie March, Nick Searcy, Tracy Morgan, and Ray Clark

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults REVIEWER:
Dr. Ted Baehr HEAD OF STATE
has a big heart. Chris Rock
plays Mays Gilliam, an
Alderman in Washington, D.C.,
who wants to help the little
guy and fight the bullies. He
becomes a hero when he saves a
woman from a building that's
about to be demolished by the
city. When the presidential
and vice presidential
candidates die in an absurd
plane crash, with only a
couple of months left in the
campaign, the party (which is
never given a name) looks for
a new presidential candidate
who won't win, but will
position the party for the
next election. Mays is the
choice. In the beginning, Mays
follows directions, but his
tough bail bondsman brother in
Chicago orders him to be
himself. As a result, his
campaign takes off as he
introduces heart and soul to
the campaign. Although the
humor is soft, there is a lot
to like in HEAD OF STATE. Mays
continually displays a good
heart. He loves God and wants
God to bless everyone. Some of
his solutions would appeal to
moral Americans. His answer to
child care is for people to
take care of their own
children, instead of shoving
them off on others. His answer
for youth crime is for people
to discipline their children
(knock them out). His answer
for Social Security is to get
the government out of people's
pockets. And, so forth.
Regrettably, though, Mays
does not mind swearing
constantly, and he opens his
campaign to appeal to pimps,
prostitutes and gangsters from
the hood. Thus, Mays manifests
God's love, but ignores God's
law, and, in truth, both God's
love and God's law go hand in
hand. HEAD OF STATE could
have been a good TV movie, but
the humor is too soft for the
big screen. Chris Rock really
wants good to triumph. He even
gets the good girl at the end.
But, regrettably, the foul
language and the references to
drugs, pimps, prostitutes, and
strippers overwhelm the heart
of the movie. Please address
your comments to: David
Geffen, Jeffrey Katzenberg &
Steven Spielberg DreamWorks
SKG 1000 Flower
Street Glendale, CA
91201 Phone: (818)
695-5000 Website:
www.dreamworks.com

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 95 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(C, PaPa, PC, LLL, V, S, N, A, DD, M) Mild Christian worldview with lots of pagan elements and mild political correctness; 67 obscenities, 2 light profanities ("Oh My God") and several borderline mockeries (the villain says "God Bless the United States and no one else," but hero (who believes in God) says "God Bless America and everyone else!"); brothers punch each other in love though it looks like a slugfest, social climbing girl has severe moments of slapstick violence, wrestlers attack hero, pushing and shoving, hero has a recurring vision of being shot behind a podium with the Presidential Seal on it and hero's body double gets shot; sweet kissing and mild groping; revealing costumes, blurred porno video flashback and caricature pimps and prostitutes; alcohol use; drugs discussed; and, lying.

GENRE: Comedy

C

PaPa

PC

LLL

V

S

N

A

DD

M

Summary:

In HEAD OF STATE, Chris Rock plays Mays Gilliam, a last choice presidential candidate, who starts to win when he introduces heart and soul to the campaign. Although the humor is soft, there is a lot to like in HEAD OF STATE, but it is seriously marred by the foul language and the references to drugs, pimps, prostitutes, and strippers.

Review:

HEAD OF STATE has a big heart. Chris Rock plays Mays Gilliam, an Alderman in Washington, D.C., who wants to help the little guy and fight the bullies. He becomes a hero when he saves a woman from a building that's about to be demolished by the city. When the presidential and vice presidential candidates die in an absurd plane crash, with only a couple of months left in the campaign, the party (which is never given a name) looks for a new presidential candidate who won't win, but will position the party for the next election. Mays is the choice.

In the beginning, Mays follows directions, but his tough bail bondsman brother in Chicago orders him to be himself. As a result, his campaign takes off as he introduces heart and soul to the campaign.

Although the humor is soft, there is a lot to like in HEAD OF STATE. Mays continually displays a good heart. He loves God and wants God to bless everyone. Some of his solutions would appeal to moral Americans. His answer to child care is for people to take care of their own children, instead of shoving them off on others. His answer for youth crime is for people to discipline their children (knock them out). His answer for Social Security is to get the government out of people's pockets. And, so forth.

Regrettably, though, Mays does not mind swearing constantly, and he opens his campaign to appeal to pimps, prostitutes and gangsters from the hood. Thus, Mays manifests God's love, but ignores God's law, and, in truth, both God's love and God's law go hand in hand.

HEAD OF STATE could have been a good TV movie, but the humor is too soft for the big screen. Chris Rock really wants good to triumph. He even gets the good girl at the end. But, regrettably, the foul language and the references to drugs, pimps, prostitutes, and strippers overwhelm the heart of the movie.

Please address your comments to:

David Geffen, Jeffrey Katzenberg & Steven Spielberg

DreamWorks SKG

1000 Flower Street

Glendale, CA 91201

Phone: (818) 695-5000

Website: www.dreamworks.com

In Brief: