HOME OF THE BRAVE

The Worst Months of Our Lives

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 11, 2007

Starring: Samuel L. Jackson, Jessica
Biel, Brian Presley, Christina
Ricci, Curtis Jackson, and
Chad Michael Murray

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 105 minutes

Distributor: MGM/Sony Pictures
Entertainment

Director: Irwin Winkler

Executive Producer: Danny Dimbort, Trevor Short,
Michael P. Flannigan, Randall
Emmett, Boaz Davidson, and
John Thompson

Producer: Avi Lerner, George Furia,
Irwin Winkler, and Rob Cowan

Writer: Mark Friedman

Address Comments To:

Dan Taylor, President
MGM Pictures
Harry Evans Sloan, Chairman/CEO
Clark Woods, President of Distribution
MGM Studios Inc.
(A privately held company of Sony Pictures Entertainment)
10250 Constellation Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 900067
Phone: (310) 449-3000
Fax: (310) 449-8819
Website: www.mgm.com

Content:

(HH, B, P, AP, PC, LLL, VVV, S, N, AA, DD, M) Strong humanist worldview in that movie ignores God and attempts to find humanist solutions to problems suffered by returning war veterans from Iraq (the answer given is always more drugs and more counseling), plus some moral and patriotic elements to the extent that movie causes viewers to care about the returned soldiers along with some anti-American, politically correct comments that are mostly rebuked; 46 obscenities and three profanities; several minutes of intense, bloody war violence, some in flashbacks, father rips lip ring out of son’s mouth, veteran takes hostages in fast food restaurant with violent climax; light sexual content includes female veteran finds new boyfriend with short scene of lovemaking and implied fornication; no nudity but female veteran gets out of shower with towel on; one veteran tries to drink away his bad memories and is obviously drunk on several occasions; several people smoke and veterans joke about all the medications they are given to help them cope and sleep, but some turn down offers of more medication; and, hostage taking and rage-filled dangerous driving.

Summary:

HOME OF THE BRAVE tells the story of four soldiers coming home from Iraq and having difficulty adjusting to civilian life. While it may be good for Americans to know more about what their troops go through on their behalf, HOME OF THE BRAVE lacks any reliance on God and is loaded to the hilt with foul language, bad attitudes, bad behavior, drinking, smoking, and drugs as well as some very strong war violence.

Review:

HOME OF THE BRAVE is a modernized version of the classic post World War II movie THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES. It tells the story of soldiers coming home from Iraq and having difficulty adjusting to civilian life because they are haunted by the horrors of war they have experienced.

The movie opens with some troops in Iraq receiving the good news they will be headed home in two weeks. Then, they are sent on a goodwill mission delivering supplies needed by some Iraqi people. The caravan is ambushed. Some troops are killed, and others are severely injured.

The movie shifts to Spokane, Wash., where Army doctor Will Marsh (played by Samuel L. Jackson) comes home to a wife and daughter who love him and a teenage son who opposes the war and resents his father’s role in it. Vanessa Price (played by Jessica Biel) comes home missing her right hand lost in the ambush. Tommy Yates (played by Brian Presley) returns for his best friend’s funeral – a casualty of the ambush. Jamal Aiken (played by Curtis Jackson) returns just plain bitter about all he’s gone through for people who don’t care.

The movie deals with bad dreams and memories, difficulty sleeping, drug use, alcoholism, and rage, among other problems, experienced by those trying to shift from battlefield conditions to civilian life. While not all soldiers come home with the problems experienced by this foursome, some do and this movie causes the typical civilian to consider the price paid by our troops for our freedom and relative safety here at home. The movie makes the war look horrible but is not anti-war. Dr. Marsh at one point looks out his kitchen window at family and friends enjoying a meal and appears to have thoughts similar to Jamal’s, but without the high level of bitterness. However, when he talks with his son he says, “If we just leave, they’ll tear each other apart.”

HOME OF THE BRAVE is not a John Wayne style exercise in building patriotism. Neither is it a liberal anti-war movie. Most viewers will wind up rooting for the troops to meld peacefully back into civilian life. The audience suffers with the soldiers when they fail and rejoices with them when they succeed. While it may be good for Americans to know more about what their troops go through on their behalf, the movie is loaded to the hilt with foul language, bad attitudes, bad behavior, drinking, smoking, and drugs as well as some very strong war violence in the opening and flashback sequences. It is also void of any reliance on God. The answer is always more drugs and counseling.

In real life, many troops do come home and adjust to civilian life without the trauma shown in this movie. Many of these troops rely on God for help in overcoming issues like lost limbs, lost friends and horrible memories. Surveys show that as many as 88 percent of Americans believe in God, but so often movies are made as if He simply doesn't exist. The filmmakers would have gagged at the idea of making the movie “unrealistic” by leaving out the foul language, but scenes of troops praying or returned troops meeting with the pastor of their church probably aren’t even considered. Modern movie “realism” ignores God, which is one reason many Christians ignore movies.

In Brief:

HOME OF THE BRAVE tells the story of soldiers coming home from Iraq and having difficulty adjusting to civilian life because they are haunted by the horrors of war they experienced. The movie deals with bad dreams and memories, difficulty sleeping, drug use, alcoholism, and rage, among other problems, experienced by those trying to shift from battlefield conditions to civilian life. The movie makes war look horrible but is not anti-war or radical leftist.

While it may be good for Americans to know what their troops go through on their behalf, HOME OF THE BRAVE is loaded with foul language, bad attitudes, bad behavior, drinking, and drugs. There is also some very strong war violence in the opening and flashback sequences. The movie is also void of any reliance on God. The answer is always more drugs and counseling. The filmmakers would have gagged at the idea of making the movie “unrealistic” by leaving out the foul language, but scenes of troops praying or returned troops meeting with the pastor of their church probably aren’t even considered. Modern movie “realism” ignores God, which is one reason many Christians ignore movies.