KANGAROO JACK

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 17, 2003

Starring: Jerry O'Connell, Anthony
Anderson, Christopher Walken,
Dyan Cannon, and Estella
Warren

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older children and
teenagers REVIEWER: Cheryl
Kull with Lisa Rice KANGAROO
JACK is a goofy comedy
designed for family audiences.
It is more appropriate,
however, for older children
and teenagers. Charlie Carbone
has a beautiful mother (Dyan
Cannon), but has been
abandoned by his real father,
leaving a vacuum for an
attentive mobster (Christopher
Walken) to sweep in and marry
his mother. As Charlie plays
on the beach one day, a chubby
black child, Louis, tries to
engage him in a
metal-detecting business, but
Charlie blows him off. Another
boy, Frankie, throws a
football to him, but it goes
into the ocean. As Charlie
tries to go after it, he
almost drowns, but Louis saves
him. Louis now insists that
Charlie will be forever
indebted to him. As time
passes, Walken sets up the
now-grown Charlie in a hair
studio, from which he gleans a
hefty 80% of the profits.
Walken also believes Charlie
is gay, which is false. The
grown-up Frankie collects the
money for the mob. The
grown-up Louis, who saved
Charlie, is still on the
scene, and he is still calling
Charlie on the fact that he
saved his life. Louis asks
Charlie to help him deliver
TVs to a warehouse, but Louis
does something wacky in
traffic and gets pulled over
by the police. Louis outruns
the police, though, and drives
straight to the warehouse,
which he doesn't realize is
being run by the mob, and by
Charlie's step-dad,
Christopher Walken! The bad
guys get arrested, but Louis
and Charlie escape, sliding
down a garbage shoot. Later,
Walken calls in Charlie and
Louis to give them a lecture.
He offers to give them a
chore, though, to redeem
themselves. They must deliver
a package to a man in
Australia, but promise not to
open the package. On the
plane, Charlie looks at a
pretty girl and flirts with
her a bit. Soon Louis and
Charlie decide to look inside
the bag, so they go back to
the bathroom together. They
find $100,000 in cash. They
scream, "Wow! It's so big!"
They are talking about the bag
and the money inside, but it
sounds like homosexual talk.
When they come out, the
flirting girl is no longer
interested in Charlie. In
Australia, the guys begin
looking for the hand-off man,
getting a rental car. In the
rental car, the guys hit a
kangaroo, and it apparently
dies. Charlie wants to bury
it, but Louis props it up,
puts sunglasses and a jacket
on it and takes pictures with
it. To their shock, the
kangaroo suddenly hops away -
with the money in its jacket!
Now the guys must find a
kangaroo tracker. They find a
researcher lady who has a
tranquilizer gun, and they
hire a drunk guy with pilot's
license who finally agrees to
fly overhead and track the
wounded roo. The trio zooms
past the hurt kangaroo. In his
haste, Louis ends up shooting
the pilot in the neck and
crashing the plane. They call
the hand-off guy and tell him
they'll give the money to him
soon. He comes to find them
but finds the pilot, takes him
hostage, and starts bullying
everyone. The guys locate the
researcher again and promise
to give her $4,800 toward
research if she will help
them, but the Aussie mobster
takes the researcher hostage
and threatens to kill her,
Louis and Charlie. Then,
Charlie's stepfather sends
another mobster, and Charlie
realizes that, unless he
stands up to the mob and uses
his brain to come up with a
clever escape, he and the
others will die. KANGAROO JACK
is a moral movie that espouses
standing up for truth and
life. There is a clear
delineation of right and
wrong, but there is homosexual
humor, body humor,
heterosexual humor, and plenty
of light foul language. The
movie also has some light
violence - including threats
and mob violence with American
and Aussie mobs, but no blood
and guts. There is also a car
chase with the police and
portrayals of drunkenness. The
movie portrays the pattern of
a boy's masculinity stripped
when a father abandons him,
but it also shows the glorious
gift of the ability to chose
whether or not to be a man,
and chose right. Jerry
O'Connell and Anthony Anderson
make a good comic team, but
some of the jokes may elicit a
groan from many
viewers. Although KANGAROO
JACK is aimed at older
children and teenagers,
caution should be exercised
because of the problematic
content cited above. Please
address your comments
to: Barry M. Meyer,
Chairman/CEO Warner Brothers
Studios 4000 Warner
Blvd. Burbank, CA
91522-0001 Phone: (818)
954-6000 Website:
www.movies.warnerbros.com

Rating: PG

Runtime: 94 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director: David McNally

Executive Producer:

Producer: Jerry Bruckheimer EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Andrew Mason, Chad
Oman and Pat Sandston

Writer: Steve Bing and Barry O'Brien

Address Comments To:

Content:

(BB, Ho, LL, V, S, N, AA, D, M) Generally moral worldview about standing up for good, fighting evil, taking one's rightful place, and choosing to do right, despite one's background and circumstances; light homosexual innuendoes, mostly anti-homosexual humor; about seven light obscenities, 15 light profanities and some scatological humor, including flatulence jokes; light slapstick violence including mob threats, car chases, etc., but no guts or gore; no sex scenes but man accidentally touches woman's breast and other oblique references to sexuality in dialogue; upper male nudity and woman in revealing top and wet clothes; some drunkenness shown in humorous light; smoking; and, miscellaneous content includes the portrayal of the grief of children with abandoning fathers.

GENRE: Comedy

BB

Ho

LL

V

S

N

AA

D

M

Summary:

In KANGAROO JACK, two childhood friends, a New York hairstylist and a would-be-entrepreneur, are forced by the mob to deliver a package to Australia, but things go haywire when the money is lost to a wild kangaroo. KANGAROO JACK is recommended only for older children and teenagers, but with caution because of mob violence, slight homosexual humor, plenty of light foul language and portrayals of drunkenness, along with some scatological and heterosexual humor.

Review:

KANGAROO JACK is a goofy comedy designed for family audiences. It is more appropriate, however, for older children and teenagers.

Charlie Carbone has a beautiful mother (Dyan Cannon), but has been abandoned by his real father, leaving a vacuum for an attentive mobster (Christopher Walken) to sweep in and marry his mother. As Charlie plays on the beach one day, a chubby black child, Louis, tries to engage him in a metal-detecting business, but Charlie blows him off. Another boy, Frankie, throws a football to him, but it goes into the ocean. As Charlie tries to go after it, he almost drowns, but Louis saves him. Louis now insists that Charlie will be forever indebted to him.

As time passes, Walken sets up the now-grown Charlie in a hair studio, from which he gleans a hefty 80% of the profits. Walken also believes Charlie is gay, which is false. The grown-up Frankie collects the money for the mob. The grown-up Louis, who saved Charlie, is still on the scene, and he is still calling Charlie on the fact that he saved his life. Louis asks Charlie to help him deliver TVs to a warehouse, but Louis does something wacky in traffic and gets pulled over by the police. Louis outruns the police, though, and drives straight to the warehouse, which he doesn't realize is being run by the mob, and by Charlie's step-dad, Christopher Walken!

The bad guys get arrested, but Louis and Charlie escape, sliding down a garbage shoot. Later, Walken calls in Charlie and Louis to give them a lecture. He offers to give them a chore, though, to redeem themselves. They must deliver a package to a man in Australia, but promise not to open the package.

On the plane, Charlie looks at a pretty girl and flirts with her a bit. Soon Louis and Charlie decide to look inside the bag, so they go back to the bathroom together. They find $100,000 in cash. They scream, "Wow! It's so big!" They are talking about the bag and the money inside, but it sounds like homosexual talk. When they come out, the flirting girl is no longer interested in Charlie.

In Australia, the guys begin looking for the hand-off man, getting a rental car. In the rental car, the guys hit a kangaroo, and it apparently dies. Charlie wants to bury it, but Louis props it up, puts sunglasses and a jacket on it and takes pictures with it. To their shock, the kangaroo suddenly hops away - with the money in its jacket! Now the guys must find a kangaroo tracker. They find a researcher lady who has a tranquilizer gun, and they hire a drunk guy with pilot's license who finally agrees to fly overhead and track the wounded roo.

The trio zooms past the hurt kangaroo. In his haste, Louis ends up shooting the pilot in the neck and crashing the plane. They call the hand-off guy and tell him they'll give the money to him soon. He comes to find them but finds the pilot, takes him hostage, and starts bullying everyone.

The guys locate the researcher again and promise to give her $4,800 toward research if she will help them, but the Aussie mobster takes the researcher hostage and threatens to kill her, Louis and Charlie. Then, Charlie's stepfather sends another mobster, and Charlie realizes that, unless he stands up to the mob and uses his brain to come up with a clever escape, he and the others will die.

KANGAROO JACK is a moral movie that espouses standing up for truth and life. There is a clear delineation of right and wrong, but there is homosexual humor, body humor, heterosexual humor, and plenty of light foul language. The movie also has some light violence - including threats and mob violence with American and Aussie mobs, but no blood and guts. There is also a car chase with the police and portrayals of drunkenness. The movie portrays the pattern of a boy's masculinity stripped when a father abandons him, but it also shows the glorious gift of the ability to chose whether or not to be a man, and chose right. Jerry O'Connell and Anthony Anderson make a good comic team, but some of the jokes may elicit a groan from many viewers.

Although KANGAROO JACK is aimed at older children and teenagers, caution should be exercised because of the problematic content cited above.

Please address your comments to:

Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO

Warner Brothers Studios

4000 Warner Blvd.

Burbank, CA 91522-0001

Phone: (818) 954-6000

Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

SUMMARY: In KANGAROO JACK, two childhood friends, a New York hairstylist and a would-be-entrepreneur, are forced by the mob to deliver a package to Australia, but things go haywire when the money is lost to a wild kangaroo. KANGAROO JACK is recommended only for older children and teenagers, but with caution because of mob violence, slight homosexual humor, plenty of light foul language and portrayals of drunkenness, along with some scatological and heterosexual humor.

In Brief: