KILL BILL - VOL. 1

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 10, 2003

Starring: Uma Thurman, David Carradine,
Darryl Hannah, Michael Madsen,
Vivica Fox, and Lucy Liu

Genre: Martial Arts Thriller/Gangster
Movie

Audience: Older teenagers and
adults REVIEWER: Lisa A.
Rice In KILL BILL - VOL. 1,
"The Bride," played by Uma
Thurman, is a female assassin
in this fourth film venture by
Quentin Tarantino, director of
the acclaimed movie PULP
FICTION. The pregnant bride is
attacked on her wedding day by
her betraying group leader and
boss, Bill (David Carradine),
whose team leaves her and the
wedding guests for dead.
Unknown to the assassins,
however, "The Bride" survives
the brutal attack but lies in
a coma for four years,
apparently losing her unborn
child in the process. After
being repeatedly raped, she
wakes up from her coma,
remembers everything about her
assassins and seeks bloody
revenge. Her plan is to
re-learn to walk, (which takes
13 hours), then locate and
eliminate every member of the
betraying assassin team,
leaving Bill for last. The
pulp fiction KILL BILL is told
in chapter format, making the
narrative flow more like a
book than a film. Tarantino
shot the movie with edgy black
and white sequences, and has
included various music styles
such as classical, country,
and flamenco music - playing
eerily over brutal scenes of
violence. Limbs and heads fly
in sword-fights, and blood
squirts like a hose from
numerous screaming, dying
victims. The movie switches to
Japanese anime to set up the
audience for the second half
of the film, which takes place
in Japan. The film ends with a
cliffhanger because Miramax
took a 3-hour movie and split
it into two 92-minute volumes.
KILL BILL - VOL. 2 is slated
for release in February, 2004.
Apparently, the second movie
will delve into "The Bride's"
husband, the baby she was
carrying, how she was found
after going into hiding, and
her relationship with the evil
head assassin, Bill. KILL BILL
is a gory, disgusting,
over-the-top, violent comic
book film about
hate-and-anger-driven revenge.
Moral audiences that might
accidentally stumble into this
movie will need to take a bath
immediately afterwards - to
cleanse the heart and mind of
the graphic images of rape and
every type of violence. The
worldview espouses Buddhism
and other false eastern
religions, as the sword master
makes comments that not even
the Lord, Buddha himself,
would survive a fight with an
opponent who used his unique
sword. There is one
anti-Christian slam as the
rapist is wearing a cross
around his neck. There is also
a scene where a policeman
reprimands his son for
swearing in the house of God,
a small church where multiple
murders of a wedding party
just took place. The tone of
KILL BILL falls into a trend
of recent dark, depressing,
and brutal movies. It's like
CHARLIE'S ANGELS on steroids,
portraying angry,
revenge-laden, sexy women who
bear no resemblance to the
wise, kind, and compassionate
wives and mothers of so many
movies and TV shows prior to
this decade. Though movies
like these are intentionally
campy, they do leave a
perverted, ungodly impression
of angry, dangerous women in
the minds of our vulnerable
sons who will be drawn to the
action of Tarentino's
films. Apparently, the KILL
BILL movies are designed to be
an extensive homage to the
martial arts movies, Japanese
gangster movies, adult
Japanese cartoons, and
spaghetti westerns that
Tarantino loves. Volume One
contains some brief, powerful
moments from Uma Thurman
regarding the physical and
emotional brutality inflicted
on her character and some
interesting scenes between her
and the samurai sword maker
played by Sonny Chuba, whose
ultra-violent STREETFIGHTER
movies influenced Tarantino.
For most of the running time,
however, Thurman's character
remains a non-entity. In fact,
the rest of the movie is a
wretched exercise in excess
that neglects elemental story
and character devices that
help audiences identify with
the protagonist. This is not
something that truly great
action movies have. If
Tarantino were truly the
cinema aficionado he claims to
be, he would not have
forgotten these basic facts of
good storytelling. Please
address your comments to: Bob
& Harvey
Weinstein Co-Chairmen Miramax
Films 8439 Sunset Blvd. West
Hollywood, CA 90069 Phone:
(323) 822-4100 Website:
www.miramax.com

Rating: R

Runtime: 92 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Films/Buena Vista/Walt
Disney Company

Director: Quentin Tarentino

Executive Producer:

Producer: Lawrence Bender EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Harvey and Bob
Weinstein

Writer: Quentin Tarentino

Address Comments To:

Content:

(PaPa, FRFR, Ab, C, LLL, VVV, SSS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Buddhist and other eastern religions espoused and hate-driven revenge sets tone, with one anti-Christian slam as rapist is wearing a cross, yet one rebuke of cursing in God's house where murder just took place; excessive language includes at least 50 obscenities and 17 profanities; violence is extremely excessive with sword-fighting, heads and limbs flying, numerous shots of violently spurting blood, eyeballs exploding, hatchets in heads, swinging, iron death ball on chain, rape, multiple beatings, chokings, etc.; sex includes attempted rape scene of woman in hospital, vulgar sexual dialogue, and discussion of and allusion to pedophilia; partially obscured upper female nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, murder in front of a child, a child kills a pedophile, rape, lying, stealing, cheating, and revenge.

GENRE: Martial Arts Thriller/Gangster Movie

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Summary:

In KILL BILL - VOL. 1, a female assassin attacked on her wedding day by her group leader, Bill, wakes up from a coma and seeks bloody revenge. Filmed in a pulp fiction, Japanese anime style, the movie is filled with over-the-top violence, sex, obscene language, rape, murder, false religions, and anti-Christian portrayals.

Review:

In KILL BILL - VOL. 1, "The Bride," played by Uma Thurman, is a female assassin in this fourth film venture by Quentin Tarantino, director of the acclaimed movie PULP FICTION. The pregnant bride is attacked on her wedding day by her betraying group leader and boss, Bill (David Carradine), whose team leaves her and the wedding guests for dead. Unknown to the assassins, however, "The Bride" survives the brutal attack but lies in a coma for four years, apparently losing her unborn child in the process. After being repeatedly raped, she wakes up from her coma, remembers everything about her assassins and seeks bloody revenge. Her plan is to re-learn to walk, (which takes 13 hours), then locate and eliminate every member of the betraying assassin team, leaving Bill for last.

The pulp fiction KILL BILL is told in chapter format, making the narrative flow more like a book than a film. Tarantino shot the movie with edgy black and white sequences, and has included various music styles such as classical, country, and flamenco music - playing eerily over brutal scenes of violence. Limbs and heads fly in sword-fights, and blood squirts like a hose from numerous screaming, dying victims. The movie switches to Japanese anime to set up the audience for the second half of the film, which takes place in Japan.

The film ends with a cliffhanger because Miramax took a 3-hour movie and split it into two 92-minute volumes. KILL BILL - VOL. 2 is slated for release in February, 2004. Apparently, the second movie will delve into "The Bride's" husband, the baby she was carrying, how she was found after going into hiding, and her relationship with the evil head assassin, Bill.

KILL BILL is a gory, disgusting, over-the-top, violent comic book film about hate-and-anger-driven revenge. Moral audiences that might accidentally stumble into this movie will need to take a bath immediately afterwards - to cleanse the heart and mind of the graphic images of rape and every type of violence. The worldview espouses Buddhism and other false eastern religions, as the sword master makes comments that not even the Lord, Buddha himself, would survive a fight with an opponent who used his unique sword. There is one anti-Christian slam as the rapist is wearing a cross around his neck. There is also a scene where a policeman reprimands his son for swearing in the house of God, a small church where multiple murders of a wedding party just took place.

The tone of KILL BILL falls into a trend of recent dark, depressing, and brutal movies. It's like CHARLIE'S ANGELS on steroids, portraying angry, revenge-laden, sexy women who bear no resemblance to the wise, kind, and compassionate wives and mothers of so many movies and TV shows prior to this decade. Though movies like these are intentionally campy, they do leave a perverted, ungodly impression of angry, dangerous women in the minds of our vulnerable sons who will be drawn to the action of Tarentino's films.

Apparently, the KILL BILL movies are designed to be an extensive homage to the martial arts movies, Japanese gangster movies, adult Japanese cartoons, and spaghetti westerns that Tarantino loves. Volume One contains some brief, powerful moments from Uma Thurman regarding the physical and emotional brutality inflicted on her character and some interesting scenes between her and the samurai sword maker played by Sonny Chuba, whose ultra-violent STREETFIGHTER movies influenced Tarantino. For most of the running time, however, Thurman's character remains a non-entity. In fact, the rest of the movie is a wretched exercise in excess that neglects elemental story and character devices that help audiences identify with the protagonist. This is not something that truly great action movies have. If Tarantino were truly the cinema aficionado he claims to be, he would not have forgotten these basic facts of good storytelling.

Please address your comments to:

Bob & Harvey Weinstein

Co-Chairmen

Miramax Films

8439 Sunset Blvd.

West Hollywood, CA 90069

Phone: (323) 822-4100

Website: www.miramax.com

SUMMARY: In KILL BILL - VOL. 1, a female assassin attacked on her wedding day by her group leader, Bill, wakes up from a coma and seeks bloody revenge. Filmed in a pulp fiction, Japanese anime style, the movie is filled with over-the-top violence, sex, obscene language, rape, murder, false religions, and anti-Christian portrayals.

In Brief: