PETER PAN

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Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 25, 2003

Starring: Jason Isaacs, Jeremy Sumpter,
Rachel Hurd-Ward, Olivia
Williams, Lynn Redgrave,
Richard Briers, and Lidivine
Sagnier

Genre: Fantasy Adventure

Audience: All ages REVIEWER: Dr. Ted
Baehr PETER PAN is a
wonderfully crafted movie that
intentionally emphasizes the
fantasy elements of the story
both in dialogue and design of
the movie (i.e., many of the
scenes look more fanciful than
realistic). Furthermore, the
movie is done with a very deft
direction to highlight the
moral aspects of the story and
minimize problematic behavior
and other elements. Thus, the
movie respects the original
story. Moreover, the casting
is terrific. For most people
who don’t know the story,
the Darling family lives in a
little row house in London.
Mr. Darling is a bank clerk
who seems overwhelmed by his
job. Mrs. Darling tries to
explain that Mr. Darling has
dreams, but he has
courageously sacrificed them
for his children. Wendy, the
13-year-old daughter, spends
her time telling fanciful
pirate yarns to her younger
brothers Michael and John. One
day, they’re visited,
perhaps in their dreams, by
Peter Pan. In the first visit,
he loses his shadow. When he
comes back, he convinces Wendy
to come with him to Neverland.
There, the Darling children go
on a rousing adventure with
the lost boys, Indians, and
pirates, led by the infamous
Captain Hook, played by Jason
Isaacs who also plays Mr.
Darling. Wendy has fallen in
love with Peter, but Peter
never wants to grow up, so he
refuses to admit he loves
Wendy. The storyline
culminates in a wonderful
ending, which may bring tears
to your eyes. This PETER PAN
is as well made as the Disney
animated movie and as
heartrending as the play,
which I used to watch as a
young boy while my father was
playing in AUNTIE MAME on
Broadway. Underneath the
fantasy is a coming-of-age
story and a girl’s first
love. The director is to be
applauded for having kept this
underlying storyline innocent
and pure. Part of the first
love syndrome, however, is the
jealousy of the father, who
also plays Captain Hook. Thus,
beneath the surface of the
story, there are some
interesting psychological
battles taking place. Although
PETER PAN mentions several
times that it’s a fantasy
and make-believe, and
emphasizes this in the
movie’s design, parents
should help children
understand that these
characters of the imagination
are not real. Little children
also may be too scared of some
of the frightening moments in
the movie. Certainly, one
reviewer was. Perhaps the only
over the top element is the
fact that Captain Hook
maliciously and casually
shoots about four of his
pirates. In other ways, the
movie is very moral. It
supports families, loving one
another, innocence, fathers,
and has lots of wonderful
messages about growing up and
other important issues. It is
interesting to note that J. M.
Barrie, who wrote the stage
play and the book, gave the
rights to a children’s home
that was strongly evangelical.
Whether he did this out of
love for children or the
Church or both is
unknown. Besides the wonderful
direction, the cast is to be
commended, especially Jason
Isaacs who plays the father
and Captain Hook. He brings
Hook alive and gives him a
depth of character, which is
wonderful to behold. All the
children look British, whether
they are or not. Rachel
Hurd-Wood, who plays Wendy, is
a terrific young actress. And,
Jeremy Sumpter is Peter Pan.
In fact, everything in the
film works together to produce
an entertaining movie that
passes too quickly. Please
address your comments
to: Stacey Snider,
Chairman Universal
Pictures Ron Meyer,
President/COO Universal
Studios 100 Universal City
Plaza Universal City, CA
91608-1085 Phone: (818)
777-1000 Web Page:
www.universalstudios.com

Rating: PG

Runtime: 112 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures CONTENT:
(BBB, Pa, V, N) Very strong
moral worldview set in a
fantasy world with some deeper
family and psychological
themes, with brief pagan
element Indian medicine woman
appeals to spirit to
“heal” Teddy Bear; no foul
language; some scary
situations which even scared
older reviewer in theater and
violence such as sword
fighting, knocking people
down, and pirate casually
shoots several of his men when
they disobey him; kissing;
obscured rear nudity of boys,
upper male nudity, and
Tinkerbell shakes her
rear-end; and, nothing else
objectionable.

Director: P. J. Hogan

Executive Producer: Mohamed Al Fayed, Gail Lyon,
and Jocelyn Moorhouse

Producer: Lucy Fisher, Douglas Wick, and
Patrick McCormick

Writer: P.J. Hogan and Michael
Goldenberg BASED ON THE PLAY
AND BOOKS BY: J. M. Barrie

Address Comments To:

Content:

(BBB, Pa, V, N) Very strong moral worldview set in a fantasy world with some deeper family and psychological themes, with brief pagan element Indian medicine woman appeals to spirit to “heal” Teddy Bear; no foul language; some scary situations which even scared older reviewer in theater and violence such as sword fighting, knocking people down, and pirate casually shoots several of his men when they disobey him; kissing; obscured rear nudity of boys, upper male nudity, and Tinkerbell shakes her rear-end; and, nothing else objectionable.

GENRE: Fantasy Adventure

BBB

Pa

V

N

Summary:

PETER PAN is a wonderfully crafted, morally uplifting movie that intentionally emphasizes the fantasy elements of the story both in dialogue and design of the film. For those who don’t know the story, one night Peter Pan and Tinkerbell whisk the Darling children, Wendy, John, and Michael, away to Neverland, where go on a rousing adventure with the lost boys, Indians, and pirates, led by the infamous Captain Hook.

Review:

PETER PAN is a wonderfully crafted movie that intentionally emphasizes the fantasy elements of the story both in dialogue and design of the movie (i.e., many of the scenes look more fanciful than realistic). Furthermore, the movie is done with a very deft direction to highlight the moral aspects of the story and minimize problematic behavior and other elements. Thus, the movie respects the original story. Moreover, the casting is terrific.

For most people who don’t know the story, the Darling family lives in a little row house in London. Mr. Darling is a bank clerk who seems overwhelmed by his job. Mrs. Darling tries to explain that Mr. Darling has dreams, but he has courageously sacrificed them for his children. Wendy, the 13-year-old daughter, spends her time telling fanciful pirate yarns to her younger brothers Michael and John.

One day, they’re visited, perhaps in their dreams, by Peter Pan. In the first visit, he loses his shadow. When he comes back, he convinces Wendy to come with him to Neverland. There, the Darling children go on a rousing adventure with the lost boys, Indians, and pirates, led by the infamous Captain Hook, played by Jason Isaacs who also plays Mr. Darling.

Wendy has fallen in love with Peter, but Peter never wants to grow up, so he refuses to admit he loves Wendy. The storyline culminates in a wonderful ending, which may bring tears to your eyes.

This PETER PAN is as well made as the Disney animated movie and as heartrending as the play, which I used to watch as a young boy while my father was playing in AUNTIE MAME on Broadway. Underneath the fantasy is a coming-of-age story and a girl’s first love. The director is to be applauded for having kept this underlying storyline innocent and pure. Part of the first love syndrome, however, is the jealousy of the father, who also plays Captain Hook. Thus, beneath the surface of the story, there are some interesting psychological battles taking place.

Although PETER PAN mentions several times that it’s a fantasy and make-believe, and emphasizes this in the movie’s design, parents should help children understand that these characters of the imagination are not real. Little children also may be too scared of some of the frightening moments in the movie. Certainly, one reviewer was. Perhaps the only over the top element is the fact that Captain Hook maliciously and casually shoots about four of his pirates.

In other ways, the movie is very moral. It supports families, loving one another, innocence, fathers, and has lots of wonderful messages about growing up and other important issues.

It is interesting to note that J. M. Barrie, who wrote the stage play and the book, gave the rights to a children’s home that was strongly evangelical. Whether he did this out of love for children or the Church or both is unknown.

Besides the wonderful direction, the cast is to be commended, especially Jason Isaacs who plays the father and Captain Hook. He brings Hook alive and gives him a depth of character, which is wonderful to behold.

All the children look British, whether they are or not. Rachel Hurd-Wood, who plays Wendy, is a terrific young actress. And, Jeremy Sumpter is Peter Pan. In fact, everything in the film works together to produce an entertaining movie that passes too quickly.

Please address your comments to:

Stacey Snider, Chairman

Universal Pictures

Ron Meyer, President/COO

Universal Studios

100 Universal City Plaza

Universal City, CA 91608-1085

Phone: (818) 777-1000

Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

SUMMARY: PETER PAN is a wonderfully crafted, morally uplifting movie that intentionally emphasizes the fantasy elements of the story both in dialogue and design of the film. For those who don’t know the story, one night Peter Pan and Tinkerbell whisk the Darling children, Wendy, John, and Michael, away to Neverland, where go on a rousing adventure with the lost boys, Indians, and pirates, led by the infamous Captain Hook.

In Brief: