PRIDE AND GLORY Add To My Top 10

Where’s the Beef?

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 24, 2008

Starring: Edward Norton, Jon Voight, Colin Farrell, Noah Emmerich, Jennifer Ehle, and John Ortiz

Genre: Police Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 125 minutes

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey L. Bewkes, CEO
Time Warner
Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Alan Horn, President/COO
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (New Line Cinema)
(A Time Warner company)
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(B, HH, C, LLL, VVV, SS, NN, AAA, DDD, MM) Light moral worldview set in a very dark, sinful, corrupt, cruel, gang-infested society where many characters are humanist and mean, with a Christian funeral, one references to a person’s gifts being from God, a lot of denials of the influence of faith by some characters, especially the villains; 256 obscenities and 16 profanities; ultra violence and threats of violence including man threatens to burn baby with hot iron, police shove nightstick down man’s throat, many fights, pointblank shootings, and pistol whippings (even of women), cruel intentional violence; drug addicted woman starts making love to man who’s just been operated on, many references to sex; full upper female nudity in one scene and many lingerie shots; extreme alcohol use including drunkenness and character is drunk half the time; extreme drug use and selling drugs shown; and, corrupt cops, cheating, stealing.

Summary:

PRIDE AND GLORY is the story of a New York City police detective whose investigation into the murder of four police officers leads to his brother and brother-in-law. Despite a promising storyline and worldview, the movie creates so much cruelty, chaos, obscene language, and evil that it almost buries the story it’s trying to tell.

Review:

PRIDE AND GLORY is the story of a New York City police family which shows that unlimited power and corruption has invaded the very heart of the police force, and this invasion ultimately demands that people take sides.

Detective Ray Tierney has relegated himself to missing persons because of a previous case gone wrong. Evidently, he compromised his high values in reporting on the case to his superiors. While most of the police are watching a police football game, four policemen are caught in an ambush in a drug infested area of the city. These men belong to the division headed by Ray’s brother, Francis. Ray’s father, the chief of Manhattan detectives, also named Francis, forces Ray to lead the investigation.

As Ray starts to dig into the case, he finds out the corruption leads all the way up to his brother and brother-in-law. Eventually, he must decide whether to keep the thin blue line code of silence or observe a higher law and do the right thing.

This storyline sounds promising, but the movie creates so much cruelty, chaos and evil that it almost buries the story it’s trying to tell. Instead of justice being done, the New York Police gang ends up fighting against the street gangs. The portrait of the police is so cruel and horrible that one wonders how the director and producer, Gavin and Gregory O’Connor, could have made this movie when they themselves grew up in a New York police family. Some of the activities of the police include stealing from innocent people, pointblank executions, stuffing a nightstick down someone’s throat, beating people to a pulp, beating woman, and threatening to take a hot iron to the face of a baby. With all the cruelty and violence, the plot fades to insignificance, and many times the movie feels boring, because you don’t care about the characters who have become so repulsive. The story is also told in a convoluted manner leaving the hero, Ray, out of too many scenes.

There have been great cop movies, such as G-MEN with James Cagney, 16 BLOCKS with Bruce Willis, IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT with Sidney Poitier, and the Steve McQueen classic BULLITT, not to mention countless TV shows from the 1950s, 1950s and 1960s. MOVIEGUIDE(r) suggests renting one of those instead of going to PRIDE AND GLORY.

In Brief:

PRIDE AND GLORY is the story of a New York City police family starring Edward Norton, Jon Voight and Colin Farrell. While most police are watching a police football game, four policemen are caught in an ambush in a dark area of the city. The victims belonged to the division headed by Detective Francis Tierney. His father, the chief of Manhattan detectives, also Francis, forces his brother Ray to lead the investigation. As Ray investigates, he finds out the corruption leads all the way up to his brother and brother-in-law. Eventually, he must decide whether to keep the thin blue line code of silence or observe a higher law and do the right thing.

This storyline sounds promising, but the movie wallows in so much cruelty, chaos and evil that it almost buries the morality tale. Instead of justice being done, the New York Police gang ends up fighting against the street gangs. With all the cruelty and violence, the plot fades to insignificance and many times the movie feels boring, because you don’t care about the characters. PRIDE AND GLORY also contains a super-abundance of excessive obscene curse words.