RESIDENT EVIL: EXTINCTION

More Zombie Slaughter

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 21, 2007

Starring: Milla Jovovich, Oded Fehr, Ali
Larter, Iain Glen, Ashanti,
and Mike Epps

Genre: Action Thriller/Horror

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 94 minutes

Distributor: Screen Gems/Sony Pictures
Entertainment

Director: Russell Mulcahy

Executive Producer: Martin Moszkowicz, Victor
Hadida and Kelly Van Horn

Producer: Bernd Eichinger, Samuel
Hadida, Robert Kulzer, Jeremy
Bolt, and Paul W. S. Anderson

Writer: Paul W. S. Anderson

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group
Sony Pictures Entertainment
(Columbia Pictures/MGM/TriStar/Screen Gems/Provident)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPa, H, Acap, E, C, BB, O, LLL, VVV, S, N, A, DD, M) Strong mixed pagan worldview with light implied humanist, anti-capitalist and environmentalist elements suggesting science and corporate greed can destroy much of life on the whole planet, plus a reference to one person’s Christian faith during a funeral, man sacrifices his life to save others, heroine battles evil scientist playing God, heroine helps women and children, and occult references where genetically engineered woman discovers telekinetic powers; 21 obscenities, one strong profanity and five light profanities; extreme gory violence, mostly people blasting away at zombies and their heads, plus lasers slice people in multiple parts, bloody wounds on female clone corpses, people let zombie dogs loose on victim who has to fight back, human zombies and zombie birds and animals eat normal people, and a mass of crows attack people and are burned by flame throwers; attempted rape and some crude sexual comments; obscured and mostly hidden female nudity when female clones are made and shown, plus upper male nudity; alcohol use; smoking and marijuana use; and, greed, evil people lie about being in danger to trap people, man hides fact from his friends that he’s turning into a raving zombie, and mad scientist experiments on zombies, people and human clones.

Summary:

In RESIDENT EVIL: EXTINCTION, a genetically engineered female hitman must fend off raging, flesh-eating zombies and a mad scientist who wants to use her DNA to increase the power of a possible antidote for a deadly virus that has turned the planet into a desert wasteland. A semi-epic story arc and some impressive set designs cannot overcome the gruesome violence on display in EXTINCTION.

Review:

In RESIDENT EVIL: EXTINCTION, a deadly virus created by the Umbrella Corporation has turned people into crazed, flesh-eating zombies and turned most of the planet into desert. The surviving company leaders, led by Dr. Isaacs, are trying to find a cure. They and Dr. Isaacs consult with one another through hologram meetings from underground bunkers around the world. Meanwhile, Alice, a female hitman genetically engineered by the corporation, teams up with a ragtag band of survivors to travel to Alaska, which they think may be safe from the virus – for now. Dr. Isaacs, however, wants to use Alice’s DNA to increase the power of his antidote. He has already made clones from her original prototype, but they aren’t good enough. Will Alice survive the zombies and the doctor’s mad intentions?

EXTINCTION sets up this video game inspired series for a final confrontation in a third movie. This semi-epic story arc and an impressive replica of modern-day Las Vegas engulfed by sand dunes cannot, however, overcome the gruesome violence on display in this movie. There’s not much time to sympathize with the characters while they’re blowing the heads off zombies. Aside from the ultra-violence, the foul language is marginally excessive, and there is also brief sexual content and some obscured nudity. The worldview is mixed and could have been more positive.

In Brief:

In RESIDENT EVIL: EXTINCTION, a deadly virus created by the Umbrella Corporation has turned people into crazed, flesh-eating zombies and turned most of the planet into desert. The surviving company leaders, led by Dr. Isaacs, are trying to find a cure. They consult with one another through hologram meetings from underground bunkers around the world. Meanwhile, Alice, a female hitman genetically engineered by the corporation, teams up with a ragtag band of survivors to travel to Alaska, which may be safe from the virus – for now. Dr. Isaacs, however, wants to use Alice’s DNA to increase the power of an antidote to the virus. Will Alice survive the zombies and the doctor’s mad intentions?

EXTINCTION sets up this video game inspired series for a final confrontation in a third movie. This epic story arc and an impressive replica of modern-day Las Vegas engulfed by sand dunes cannot, however, overcome the gruesome violence on display. There’s not much time to sympathize with the characters while they’re blowing the heads off zombies. Aside from the ultra-violence, the foul language is marginally excessive, but there is brief sexual content and some nudity.