SUTURE

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 30, 1994

Starring: Dennis Haysbert, Mel Harris,
Sab Shimono, & Dina Merrill

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: No MPAA rating

Runtime: 102 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Company

Director: Scott McGehee & David Siegel

Executive Producer:

Producer: Scott McGehee & David Siegel

Writer: Scott McGehee & David Siegel

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Content:

(H, L, VVV, S) Humanism; 1 obscenity & 2 profanities; brief view of man's face after it is destroyed by shotgun blast; various shots of needles stuck into a man's body during dream sequences; close-up of suture removal; sexual immorality implied; and, unconvincing endorsement of Freudian worldview.

Summary:

SUTURE is the low-budget, black and white project of a pair of young filmmakers who have gained notoriety for their short films. The first few minutes of this movie are terrific, but what follows is boring nonsense, in which a potentially interesting mystery is squandered on stupid Freudian notions about dreams and identity. Even worse is a persistent "in-joke" about a black and a white man being considered strikingly similar in appearance.

Review:

SUTURE is the low-budget, black and white project of a pair of young filmmakers who have gained notoriety for their short films. Indeed, the first few minutes of this movie are terrific, arousing both suspense and curiosity. This opening sequence is most effective, but what follows is plodding, self-indulgent mush, with a persistent "in joke" that becomes increasingly ridiculous and ultimately a huge bust. Clay Arlington is invited to Phoenix by his brother Vincent under a pretense of spending some time together after their father's funeral. The joke is a repeated reference to the striking similarity of these two. The only problem is that Vincent is white, thin and Germanic in appearance, while Clay is black.

A lot of insipid dialogue (veering dangerously close to SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE parody) attempts to make a profound statement about the nature of identity, memory, dreams, and perception in SUTURE. However, everyone's assumption that Clay and Vincent look alike undermines the whole effort. We keep waiting to be let in on the explanation, or the insightful twist that never happens. Even a patient observance of the scrolling credits doesn't solve anything. The gag is waiting on the film's poster: "SUTURE--a film in which nothing is black or white." However, there is something very black and white about this film: after the first three minutes, it is a boring waste of time.

In Brief: