SYDNEY WHITE

Politically Correct Ending

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 21, 2007

Starring: Amanda Bynes, Sara Paxton,
Matt Long, Jack Carpenter,
Jeremy Howard, and John
Schneider

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 102 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures/General
Electric

Director: Joe Nussbaum

Executive Producer: Guy McElwaine and Wayne Morris

Producer: James G. Robinson, Clifford
Werber and David Robinson

Writer: Chad Gomez Creasey

Address Comments To:

Jeff Zucker, President/CEO, NBC Universal Entertainment (A division of General Electric)
Ron Meyer, President/COO, Universal Studios
Marc Shmuger, Chairman
David Linde, Co-Chairman
Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(RoRo, PCPCPC, HoHo, B, C, LL, V, S, N, A, M) Strong Romantic worldview with very strong politically correct ending supporting a multicultural agenda, including promotion of homosexual evil, mitigated by some positive moral elements plus a visit to a kitchen for the homeless set in a Christian church; 11 obscenities and three light profanities; very light comic violence such as thrown football knocks man down and small electrical fires must be extinguished several times; college student clearly lusts for sexual relations with women, girl’s plumber father uses plumbing fixtures to teach daughter about menstruation in one scene, college men stare at woman’s bra hanging in the bathroom, a few references to homosexuality and a minor transsexual character and reaching out to them politically, and girls invite young men to come naked to a hot tub at college/fraternity but there is no hot tub and they expose the men to the other partygoers (nothing really salacious shown); upper male nudity and some female cleavage; alcohol use and two men hanging upside down chug from beer keg at a college/fraternity party; no smoking or drugs; and, daughter tells father on phone that things are going great at college but they are not really, villain bribes a man to disrupt another person’s computer hard drive, and mean sorority leader humiliates people she doesn’t like, but she gets her comeuppance.

Summary:

SYDNEY WHITE, a comedy based on the fairy tale of Snow White, stars Amanda Bynes as a petite tomboy who teams up with seven nerdy dorks to end the reign of a sorority queen who runs a small college campus through the student council. SYDNEY WHITE starts off as a halfway decent, relatively clean movie for teenagers, but then becomes a politically correct fairy tale with a few offensive references to sexual immorality, including an overt acceptance of homosexuality.

Review:

SYDNEY WHITE is a modern fairy tale based on Snow White that could be titled “Sydney White and the Seven Dorks.” What starts out as a clever family-friendly comedy, however, becomes a politically correct fairy tale at the end with a few offensive references to sexual immorality, including an overt acceptance of homosexuality.

Amanda Bynes plays the title role, Sydney White, a petite tomboy who wants to follow in the footsteps of her late mother. That means joining her mother’s sorority at Southern Atlantic University, Kappa Phi Nu. Rachel Witchburn, the Kappa president and student council president, hates Sydney, however, because Sydney attracts the attentions of Rachel’s ex-boyfriend, Tyler Prince.

Rachel eventually gets Sydney kicked out of the sorority. There’s only one place for Sydney to go: the dilapidated college house where seven dorky male students live. Sydney urges the boys to end Rachel’s reign on campus by running for student council. Rachel fights back, however, which leads to the movie’s climactic election battle.

SYDNEY WHITE starts off as a halfway decent, relatively clean movie for teenagers. It even has a nice scene set in a kitchen for the homeless located in a Christian church. Then, however, the movie overstays its welcome by preaching a weird kind of politically correct multiculturalism where student politicians, the nation’s future leaders, reach out not only to Orthodox Jews but also to homosexuals, people who get sex change operations, people who have adopted the depressing Goth lifestyle, and dorks with raging hormones itching to lose their virginity. Everyone feels like outsiders at some point, the movie argues, implying that people who lust after sex or engage in perverted homosexual acts are just misunderstood creatures who need love and acceptance.

Of course, this is the Romantic philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lord Byron and others, which teaches that people are inherently good and noble rather than sinful as the Bible clearly teaches, that people are corrupted by civilization, that feelings are more important than logic and reason, that imagination should not be restrained by rules and regulations, and that individual human rights are more important than moral duty. Socially, politically and theologically, Romanticism has been disastrous. For instance, it has led to unrestrained nationalism like that of Adolf Hitler, radical socialism like that of Joseph Stalin and Mao, mystical notions of the brotherhood of humanity, and a preference for emotional and mystical experiences in religion at the expense of systematic theology rooted in a logical, comprehensive interpretation of the biblical texts that define Christianity.

In reflecting Romantic philosophy, SYDNEY WHITE teaches that individual human rights are more important than moral rules and regulations. It also argues overtly for the “inclusive” politics of the religious left. As the heroine’s political science teacher says in the movie, politicians should not just reach out to their base, but also to all kinds of minority groups. As usual, Evangelical Christians and conservatives are not included in this mixed-up, mind-numbing notion of “diversity.”

SYDNEY WHITE also contains some foul language and a few off-color jokes.

In Brief:

SYDNEY WHITE stars Amanda Bynes as a petite tomboy who wants to follow in the footsteps of her late mother. That means joining her mother’s sorority at Southern Atlantic University. Rachel Witchburn, the sorority president and student council president, hates Sydney White because Sydney attracts the attentions of Rachel’s ex-boyfriend, Tyler Prince. Rachel eventually gets Sydney kicked out of the sorority, so Sydney teams up with seven nerdy dorks to end Rachel’s reign on the student council. Her political science teacher encourages her to reach out to minorities, including the homosexual community.

SYDNEY WHITE starts off as a halfway decent, relatively clean movie for teenagers. It even has a nice scene set in a kitchen for the homeless in a Christian church. Then, the movie overstays its welcome by preaching a weird kind of politically correct multiculturalism where student politicians, the nation’s future leaders, reach out not only to Orthodox Jews but also to homosexuals, people who get sex change operations, people who have adopted the depressing Goth lifestyle, and dorks with raging hormones itching to lose their virginity. SYDNEY WHITE also contains some foul language and some off-color jokes.