THE COWBOY WAY

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 03, 1994

Starring: Woody Harrelson, Kiefer
Sutherland, Dylan McDermott, &
Ernie Hudson

Genre: Action/Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers & Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 101 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: William Witliff & Joe Gayton

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, LLL, VVV, SS, NNN, A/D, M) Pagan worldview; 85 Obscenities & 9 Profanities; 7 violent deaths, 1 graphic portrayal of man dragged behind train; implied adultery & promiscuity, almost constant sexual innuendo; partial female and full male nudity (genitals covered); alcohol, cigarette & chewing tobacco use; and, destruction of property & theme of taking the law into your own hands.

Summary:

Billed as the comic adventures of two cowboys in New York City and containing quite a bit of bawdy humor, Universal's THE COWBOY WAY proposes a moral code in which honor comes by way of lots of drinking, lots of cursing, lots of vigilante-ism, disregard for property, and promiscuity. While containing a potentially humorous premise, the film manages only to offend.

Review:

Billed as the comic adventures of two cowboys in New York City and containing quite a bit of bawdy humor, THE COWBOY WAY proposes a moral code in which honor comes by way of lots of drinking, lots of cursing, lots of vigilante-ism, disregard for property, and promiscuity. Sonny and Pepper (Kiefer Sutherland and Woody Harrelson) grew up together in the rodeo in New Mexico, only to have reached a point of contention when Pepper pulled a no-show at the National Championships. Pepper is reckless and naive, but Sonny still admires his talents. The two set out for New York to locate a missing friend and his daughter and encounter danger, adventure, women, humor, and all-around cowboy action.

Along with the anticipated amount of violence in this modern western, and some of it rather graphic, it is also implied that to be a cowboy means to have a vocabulary laced liberally with expletives, a fact anyone who has been around cowboys knows to be suspect. The attempts at giving depth to the two characters and their relationship by way of self-revelation and confession are overshadowed by the sense that at the core these guys are overgrown adolescents and that not much seems to get below primal emotion. These two have their own moral code which sometimes coincides with the rest of society but often simply serves their own purpose.

In Brief: