ANVIL! THE STORY OF ANVIL

Rocking On and On and On. . .

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 10, 2009

Starring: N/A

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Adults

Rating: NR

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Abramorama

Director: Sacha Gervasi

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Rebecca Yeldham

Writer: None

Address Comments To:

Richard Abramowitz, President
Abramorama
Email: richard@abramorama.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, RoRoRo, AbAb, B, C, LLL, V, SS, NNN, AA, DD, MM) Very strong pagan, Romantic worldview with two positive references to Satan and several references to 666 and lewd behavior but some uplifting talk about the importance of family and one mention of the need for hope, which belies the rebellious aspect of the protagonists’ vocation, plus one positive reference to celebrating Christmas in scene of protagonist’s extended family; 109 mostly strong obscenities (mostly “f” words) and no profanities; light violence during two arguments when man grabs clothes of another man he’s arguing with; several strong sexual references such as man wearing sado-masochistic outfit plays guitar with a sex toy and lewd lyrics are quoted; full frontal male nudity in a photo of a man shown and upper male nudity; alcohol use and drunken people in nightclubs; smoking and a reference to drugs; and, rebellion extolled.

Summary:

ANVIL! THE STORY OF ANVIL is a documentary about one of the heavy metal bands of the early 1980s that never made it big. The documentary does a good job of making the band sympathetic and showing some of the support they get from their families, but it is sometimes repetitive and contains abhorrent references to Satan, 666, rebellion, and some lewd behavior.

Review:

ANVIL! THE STORY OF ANVIL is a documentary about one of the heavy metal bands of the early 1980s that never made it big.

The movie opens with a rock festival in 1984 in Japan where Anvil, a heavy metal band from Toronto, Canada, sees some success with the song “Metal on Metal.” Thirty-five years after meeting at age 14, drummer Robb Reiner and singer Steve “Lips” Kudlow are still together 20 years after that concert, still trying to make the band really popular.

Anvil is depicted as the ultimate underdog. As one famous metal guy puts it in the movie, “Everybody’s just sort of ripped them off and left them for dead.”

The documentary shows the band going through a bad European tour and spending money to make a new album with a better producer. Through it all, they get support from their families, some of whom still have hope and some of whom have lost hope.

The director of this documentary does a good job of making viewers root for his underdog subjects. Even so, it’s hard to say whether this topic deserves a full-length feature. Of course, heavy metal and rock star success is all that motivates the two protagonists. Also, there are positive references to Satan, 666, rebellion, and lewd behavior. The movie shows, however, that even iconoclastic, satanic heavy metal rockers extol the importance of family and friendship. Thus, at the end, the movie focuses on the close relationship between the two protagonists and their families. In the final analysis, all people, including those who reject God and those who make documentaries about heavy metal music with a satanic attitude, are living in God’s universe under His rules.

In Brief:

ANVIL! THE STORY OF ANVIL is a documentary about one of the 1980s heavy metal bands that never made it big. The movie opens with a rock festival in 1984 in Japan where Anvil, a heavy metal band from Toronto, Canada, sees some success with the song “Metal on Metal.” Twenty years later, drummer Robb Reiner and singer Steve Kudlow are still together, still trying to make the band really popular. They are the ultimate underdogs. The documentary shows them going through a bad European tour and spending money to make a new album with a better producer. Through it all, they get support from their families, some of whom still hope and some of whom have lost all hope.

The director of this documentary does a good job of making viewers root for his underdog subjects. Even so, it’s hard to say whether this topic deserves a full-length feature. Playing heavy metal music and rock star success is all that the two protagonists want. Also, the documentary contains positive references to Satan, 666, rebellion, and lewd behavior. The movie shows, however, that even iconoclastic, satanic heavy metal rockers need their families.