EVEN THE RAIN

Does Christian Colonization Equal Evil Capitalism?

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 18, 2011

Starring: Gael Garcia Bernal, Luis
Tosar, Karra Elejalde,
Cassandra Ciangherotti, Raul
Arevalo, Juan Carlos Aduviri,
Carlos Santos, Vicente Romero,
Milena Soliz

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older Teens & Adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 104 minutes

Distributor: Vitagraph Films

Director: Iciar Bollain

Executive Producer: Pilar Benito

Producer: Juan Gordon

Writer: Paul Laverty

Address Comments To:

David Schultz, President, Vitagraph Films
The Distribution Arm of American Cinematheque
1800 North Highland Avenue, Suite 717
Los Angeles, CA
Phone: (323) 461-2020, ext. 123; Fax: (323) 461-9737
Website: prettybug.com/vitagraph/
Email: davids@americancinematheque.com

Content:

(HH, SoSo, AcapAcap, Ab, B, C, FR, RHRHRH, LLL, VV, S, NN, AA, DDD, MM) Mostly mixed, humanist worldview with strong elements of socialism and politics of greed, anti-biblical behavior portrayed with Spanish conquistadors even though they are quoting Scripture and praying in the name of Christ, Catholic prayers to Mary, Scripture quoted, Colonization of the New World portrayed as evil even though some monks and priests are depicted in a positive light in view of the conquering Spanish, some pagan elements of false religion shown with New World Natives, and excessive Marxist revisionist history; excessively strong language with 81 obscenities, 5 profanities and one obscene gesture; violence includes riot footage, people being shot, pushed, shoved, punching, police blockades, tear gas, rocks and bottles thrown at police, vandalism, villagers attack police, simulated/movie scene where man has arm cut off because he did not bring enough gold to the conquistadors, simulated/movie scene where natives are burned at the stake by conquistadors; some sensuality; brief native upper female nudity, upper male nudity; beer, wine and alcohol use depicted throughout and one character is an alcoholic; cigarette and cigar smoking throughout the movie; lying, rebellion against government, people riot against police, filmmakers only interested in getting their movie made to make money for their investors even though citizens around them are starving and dying of thirst.


Summary:

EVEN THE RAIN is a liberal Spanish-language movie within a movie set against the “Cochabamba Water Wars” of Bolivia in 2000. EVEN THE RAIN is well told, but its leftist, revisionist, false politics is combined with lots of strong foul language.


Review:

EVEN THE RAIN is a Spanish-language movie within a movie set against the “Cochabamba Water Wars” of Bolivia in 2000. It tells the story of a director who is trying to shoot his picture about Columbus and the Spanish colonization of the New World even while one of his featured actors is leading the local protests against water privatization.
Famed director, Sebastian, and his hard-nosed producer, Costa, have come to Bolivia to save money while finishing their epic movie about Christopher Columbus, the Spaniards’ colonization of the New World and the mistreatment of the native residents in the New World. Their story focuses on the exploitation of people for the greed of politicians and private companies, in a time when gold was the greatest commodity.
Their movie, however, takes a back seat to the upheaval that is taking place as the local citizenry is protesting the government’s privatization of water resources for multinational corporations. As they shoot their movie, they realize that the same exploitation in Columbus’ day is still happening today. Only now, water is the new gold.
EVEN THE RAIN is told well. It effectively interlaces the contemporary riot footage with the historical movie footage being shot by Sebastian. As the production team fights to make their movie on the cheapest budget possible by paying local extras $2-per-day, they are faced with the plight of the local citizenry who are seeing a 300% increase in their water costs. The movie deftly interlaces the lines of the “actors” shooting their fictional history of Columbus and the Spaniards with that of the people allegedly struggling to fight the same fight today.
EVEN THE RAIN contains some anti-capitalist elements, some politics of envy and greed and other mixed elements. Also, even though Christian worldview elements are portrayed, some of the conquistadors use Christ as a means for financial profit. That said, some of the monks in the “movie” also portray true faith and true charity to the local natives. Media-wise viewers should take extreme caution while watching, so that they can separate the exploitation and greed from the true faith in Christ’s name that rescues people from their paganism.
That said, the Spanish were joined by many of the local Indian tribes in fighting the Incas, Aztecs and even the Mayans, because of the abhorrent, cruel, sadistic Inca, Aztec and Mayan cultures. The Aztecs were sacrificing thousands of people by ripping out their hearts from the living person and throwing their bodies down the steps of the pyramids. Their cruelty was well documented in their own writings. They manifested true evil. For all their failings, the Spaniards and Portuguese brought peace and civilization to the land. In fact, according to authors like Michael Novak, some of their policies were not as pro-capitalist as those of the French and English, whose policies led to more prosperity in North America when compared to Central and South America.
Revisionist history is wrong whether about the Holocaust or the Indians in the New World. And, it is wrong to vilify historical figures like Columbus and Cortez while romanticizing the leading pagan tribes they fought against. Not only did the Indians have human sacrifice, they also had wars and slavery long before any European even set foot in the Caribbean and the Americas. That, of course, doesn’t excuse European forms of slavery, which could be more brutal in Central and South America than in the United States. People who do not read and study real history are easily deceived.
As Dr. Peter Jones writes:
“Two years ago, President Evo Morales, of Incan/Aymaran descent, claimed the rights to all three branches of government, and his goons were eliminating opponents in the dead of night. At the time, I was teaching pastors in Cochabamba, Bolivia and so witnessed the rise of indigenous paganism as a political force. In January 2011, Morales introduced legislation that grants legal rights to the Earth and provides an ombudsman to hear nature's complaints as voiced by the all-knowing high priests of deep ecology, who claim to be spiritually in touch with Nature!
The worship of Pachamama, the fertility Goddess of Nature, is now a fundamental element in the law code of Bolivia, and Morales (in his commitment to Pachamama and to the ancient Incan religion of Bolivia) is supported by a shadow cabinet of shamans, who sacrifice llamas as part of this spirituality. . . .
“Bolivia is perhaps the first example of a Marxist state that is religiously, occultically pagan. Is Bolivia a picture of our global future – a spiritual, nature-worshiping collectivist state, where Caesar is Lord?”
- Peter Jones, truthXchange, May 06, 2011.
Privatization of water rights is not wrong, especially if there is enough competition so that no one person or entity can control the market and drive up the price. Of course, that is exactly what government officials do when the people hand their property rights over to them.
EVEN THE RAIN also has some violent content from the riots as well as a whole lot of foul language from the production crew, which will thankfully limit the audience for this example of leftist revisionist history.


In Brief:

EVEN THE RAIN is a liberal Spanish-language movie within a movie set against the “Cochabamba Water Wars” of Bolivia in 2000. Famed director, Sebastian, and his hard-nosed producer, Costa, have come to Bolivia to save money while finishing their epic movie about the Spanish colonization of the New World. Their story focuses on the exploitation of people for the greed of politicians and private companies, in a time when gold was the greatest commodity. Their movie, however, takes a back seat to the upheaval taking place among the local citizens protesting the government’s privatization of water resources for multinational corporations. As they shoot their movie, the filmmakers realize that water is the new gold.
EVEN THE RAIN’s simplistic political tale is told well. It interlaces the contemporary riot footage with the historical movie footage being shot by Sebastian. However, propaganda is propaganda. In reality, the Spanish were joined by many of the local Indian tribes in fighting the cruel Incas, Aztecs and Mayans. Also, the real history is that the pagan leftist government in Bolivia has turned out to be much worse than the multinational companies this movie rails against.