JASON GOES TO HELL: THE FINAL FRIDAY Add To My Top 10

Content -4
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 13, 1993

Starring: John LeMay, Kari Keegan, Erin Gray, Allison Smith, Steven Culp, & Steven Williams

Genre: Horror

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: Approximately 100 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Adam Marcus

Executive Producer:

Producer: EXECUTIVEPRODUCER: Sean S. Cunningham

Writer: Jay Huguely & Adam Marcus

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Content:

(LLL, A/D, NN, SSS, VVV, OO) Heavily seasoned with over 100 obscenities & profanities; substance abuse; nudity; graphic sexual scenes; many graphic scenes of violence; and, occultism.

Summary:

JASON GOES TO HELL: THE FINAL FRIDAY is much more than horror: it is horrible. Jason goes to hell; and, in so doing, many innocent viewers are unnecessarily victimized by graphic, gruesome, farfetched, unimaginative, repetitive hyperbole.

Review:

JASON GOES TO HELL: THE FINAL FRIDAY, begins, like the others, at Crystal Lake where Jason drowned when he was 11 years old. As the film opens, the police pump 100 rounds of ammunition into him, and he is blown into innumerable pieces. However, tireless, dedicated workers retrieve every piece, put each of them into a body bag and haul them away in order to perform an autopsy. Amazingly, Jason's heart is still beating. The coroner, hypnotized by the heart, "eats" it; and so, Jason lives again! This time, he has the power to jump into one body after another. Even so, he has a major problem: he realizes that he can die or be killed unless he is reborn through one of his three remaining blood relatives. After all he has survived, no one knows how he comes to that conclusion.

From there, the plot weakens and worsens. In fact, the plot is nothing more than a few gallons of blood, some loud music, a little nudity, and a few glimmering knives. Furthermore, JASON GOES TO HELL is a blatant compilation of several different horror movies. In the final analysis, the movie is absurd. It is good that Jason goes to hell; however, it is regrettable that he doesn't take a short cut. Instead, he goes the long way about it; and, in so doing, many innocent viewers are unnecessarily victimized by farfetched, unimaginative, repetitive hyperbole.

In Brief: