MISS BALA

Depressing Perspective

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 27, 2012

Starring: Stephanie Sigman, Noe Hernandez, James Russo, Jose Yenque

Genre: Crime Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: ** Depressing Perspective **

Runtime: 113 minutes

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO, News Corp.
Chase Carey, President/COO, News Corp.
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen/CEO, Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp. (Fox Searchlight Pictures/Fox International/Fox Atomic/FoxFaith)
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(HHH, PCPCPC, LLL, VV, SS, NN, AA, DDD, MM) Very strong implied humanist, politically correct worldview from a liberal or libertarian mindset that attacks the drug war in Mexico as being hurtful to the common people, who are also not helped by a corrupt police force only using the drug war to gain power (this last part is a little vague and unfocused); 35 obscenities (mostly “f” words) and one GD; strong intense violence includes U.S. drug agent executed, shootouts with police, armed men shoot up seedy multi-room nightclub, drug lord kidnaps female protagonist and threatens her family; strong sexual content includes depicted fornication in one scene, it’s implied national police force leader frequents prostitutes, national police force leader asks female protagonist to take off her dress but shootout occurs before anything else happens, kissing, woman forced to sleep next to drug lord; rear female nudity in a couple scenes, upper and rear male nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking and story is about drug gangs; and, corruption, kidnapping, bribery, attempted assassination.

Summary:

MISS BALA is a Mexican movie about the drug war that focuses on a young beauty pageant contestant who mistakenly gets involved with a drug lord who forces her to deliver messages for him. The movie’s depressing ending seems to take a liberal position against any kind of drug regulation or enforcement. MISS BALA also contains excessive foul language and strong sexual content.

Review:

MISS BALA is a humanist, politically correct condemnation of the drug war in Mexico and how it affects the people there, including a would-be contestant in a beauty pageant.

The story focuses on young Laura, who wants to enter the Miss Baja beauty pageant in a Mexican border city. The night before the contest, Laura and her best friend go to celebrate at a seedy nightclub. A group of armed men enter the place, killing several people, including Laura’s friend.

Laura hides from the killers. After the slaughter, she tries to find out what happened to her friend (she doesn’t know at first), but a corrupt police official delivers her straight into the hands of the leader responsible for the killings, a drug kingpin named Lino.

Lino puts Laura to work delivering messages for him and, eventually, even assisting in weapons trafficking across the border. In return, Lino promises to help her with the pageant.

Laura tries to escape, but Lino threatens her family and eventually has his way with her. At the pageant, Lino manages to get her crowned Miss Baja, but, by then, Laura is completely numb.

After the pageant, Lino has one more task for Laura. He wants her to go a gathering and get into the bedroom of the Mexican police force’s general. Lino plans to assassinate the general, but things go wrong.

MISS BALA is Mexico’s official Oscar entry for Best Foreign Language Film, but it failed to get nominated. According to the press notes, Laura’s story is meant to be a metaphor for the country’s endless nightmare of violence, poverty and corruption. This might have been a good metaphor were it not that the movie gives a completely secular and humanist view of the situation. MISS BALA has a godless humanist worldview. Also, the movie’s depressing ending seems to take a liberal/libertarian position against any kind of drug regulation or enforcement. The conclusion one takes away is that the drug war is a complete waste and the Mexican police are too corrupt to make changes for the better. This, however, is not God’s position, and it shouldn’t be anyone else’s position either.

MISS BALA also contains excessive, strong foul language and strong sexual content.

In Brief:

MISS BALA is a Mexican movie about the drug war. The story focuses on young Laura, who wants to enter a regional beauty pageant. The night before the contest, Laura and her best friend go to celebrate at a nightclub. Armed men enter the place, killing several people, including Laura’s friend. Laura hides from the killers. After the slaughter, she tries to find out what happened to her friend. However, a corrupt police official delivers her straight into the hands of the leader responsible for the killings, a drug kingpin named Lino. Lino puts Laura to work delivering messages. In return, Lino promises to help her with the pageant, but Laura’s life spirals out of control.

MISS BALA is Mexico’s official Oscar entry. Laura’s story is meant to be a metaphor for the country’s endless nightmare of violence, poverty and corruption. This might have been a good metaphor were it not that the movie gives a completely humanist view of the situation. Thus, the movie’s depressing ending seems to take a liberal position against any kind of drug regulation or enforcement. MISS BALA also contains excessive foul language and strong sexual content.