RUNAWAY SLAVE Add To My Top 10

Run From Tyranny to Liberty

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Release Date: January 13, 2013

Starring: The Rev. C.L. Bryant, Glenn Beck, Rep. Allan West, Herman Cain, Andrew Breitbart, Thomas Sowell, Alveda King, Star Parker, Jesse Lee Patterson, Armstrong Williams

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 111 minutes

Distributor: Rocky Mountain Pictures

Director: Pritchett Cotton

Executive Producer: Luke Livingston

Producer: Beverly Zaslow

Writer: Pritchett Cotten

Address Comments To:

Ron Rodgers and Randy Slaughter, Principal Partners, Rocky Mountain Pictures
4239 Lincoln Pines Court
Salt Lake City, UT 84124
Phone: (801) 943-1720; Fax: (801) 944-8709
Website: www.rockymtnpictures.com; Email: ron@rockymtnpictures.com

Content:

(CC, BB, ACAC, So, P, L, S, M) Strong Christian, moral worldview as The Reverend C.L. Bryant shares his story and listens to the stories of other African Americans and their sentiments on the freedom of the African Americans of today, some advocate moving forward together as one while others still seek reparation or penitence of some kind for the plight of the African American during slavery, Jim Crow era, etc., plus strong anti-socialist worldview exposing the negative outcomes of big government and government welfare programs in the black or poor communities with some socialist comments and a patriotic worldview expressed to a lesser degree; about three to five light obscenities and profanities, plus the “n” word is spoken as a black man recounts his experiences; no violence but some yelling and arguing among people with different opinions on issues; no sexual content but woman interviewed appears to be a prostitute on the street; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking/drug use; and, light miscellaneous immorality but just discussed.


Summary:

RUNAWAY SLAVE is a compelling, intriguing documentary that explores race and politics in America and to what extent African Americans believe they are free from tyranny in the 21st Century. The worldview of RUNAWAY SLAVE is Christian with some pro-socialist and anti-socialist arguing back and forth, but the movie ultimately admonishes Americans to run from socialism and progressivism and stay free.


Review:

RUNAWAY SLAVE is an intriguing, compelling documentary. It explores race and politics in America and to what extent African Americans believe they are free.
The movie follows The Rev. C.L. Bryant, an African American and former pastor and activist. He asks the question, “Are we free at last?” The filmmakers show him follow various threads to find the answer to that query.
He attends the “Restore Hope” campaign organized by Glenn Beck at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., where the population in attendance is predominantly white. Then, viewers are spirited away to another venue in town where Bryant attends Rev. Al Sharpton’s “Reclaim the Dream” rally, where the population attending is predominantly African American. A myriad of community members, preachers, political leaders, and other personalities are seen giving their insights on the state of the black community, socioeconomic issues, and the government.
In addition to the urban scenes, Bryant also shares his story and heritage as a native of a rural town in Georgia. His 64-acre wooded homeland was passed down to him. He shared how many slaves were allowed to have property. As the camera follows him in his neighborhood, Bryant talks about his Christian faith and his calling as a pastor. He reminisces how he was fired as pastor after nearly a decade due to not making political stances the way the church preferred. The story then follows Bryant back to the urban community and various other locations, including Philadelphia.
At the end of the movie, African American interviewees comment on the freedoms and opportunities they do have in America, and their pride in being an American. Bryant admonishes Americans to run from socialism and progressivism and stay free.
Throughout RUNAEWAY SLAVE, there’s a heavy use of jump cuts, hand-held shooting, creative transitions, juxtapositions of shots that add interest only when not overused. Less is more, and the movie often used far more camera editing tricks than necessary. However, the overall composition of shots is clear.
The worldview of RUNAWAY SLAVE is Christian with a strong socialist and anti-socialist elements as Republican, Democratic, and Tea Party supporters converge to share their clashing social views as they address issues pertinent to all Americans today. Eventually, it’s the anti-socialist, patriotic elements that are reaffirmed at the end by a number of African Americans.
RUNAWAY SLAVE is a very worthwhile experience. It may require some discernment for young children because of some arguing and a woman interviewed on the street, who may be a prostitute.


In Brief:

RUNAWAY SLAVE is a compelling, intriguing documentary. It explores race and politics in America and to what extent African Americans believe they are free. The movie follows The Rev. C.L Bryant, an African American and former pastor and activist. He asks the question, “Are we free at last?” The filmmakers show the reverend follow various threads to find the answer to that query. A myriad of community members, preachers, political leaders, and other personalities give their insights on the state of the black community, socioeconomic issues, and the government.
RUNAWAY SLAVE uses more camera and editing tricks than necessary. However, the overall composition of shots is clear. The worldview of RUNAWAY SLAVE is Christian with a strong anti-socialist viewpoint that is sometimes seen in a negative light as Republican, Democratic, and Tea Party supporters converge to share their clashing social views. RUNAWAY SLAVE is a very worthwhile experience. It may require some discernment for young children because of some arguing and a woman interviewed who may be a prostitute.