THE CHAMBER Add To My Top 10

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Release Date: October 11, 1996

Starring: Chris O'Donnell, Gene Hackman, Faye Dunaway, Lela Rachon, & Bo Jackson

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 110 minutes

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Content:

(C, Ab, LLL, VV, A, D, M) Mild Christian worldview with anti-Christian elements of Klansman distorting Scripture for evil; 43 obscenities & 7 profanities; moderate violence including implied suicide, bombing building, implied hanging, threats with guns, shootings deaths, & brief image of gas chamber killing man; no sex; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, lying

Summary:

THE CHAMBER is the newest filmed version of a John Gresham novel. It tells the story of attorney Adam Hall who desperately attempts to save his racist grandfather from the gas chamber. Overstated, lacking in technical perfection, tainted by political correctness, violence, and obscenities, THE CHAMBER, nevertheless, contains some gripping and disturbing commentary which addresses some serious issues affecting our society today.

Review:

In THE CHAMBER, Sam Cayhill , played by Gene Hackman, is an unrepentant racist, wasting away the final years of his life on a Mississippi prison's death row. Cayhill has been convicted of killing the children of a Jewish lawyer, 16-years-ago. Now, the ominous specter of the gas chamber is looming, as appeal after appeal has been rejected in the courts. Adam Hall, played by Chris O'Donnell, enters to save Cahill's life. The young attorney also happens to be Sam's grandson and has a profound personal stake in saving the old man's life since Adam's father committed suicide some years ago because he could not bear the family shame. Adam is undaunted and pursues any leads which could keep the old man away from certain execution with dogged determination.

This John Gresham movie makes a strong case for the family. Hall's deeper motivation is to somehow put his broken family back together again. Once again, morality is filtered through the usual Hollywood lens where the death penalty is cruel punishment and suicide is a noble way to deal with guilt. Overstated, lacking in technical perfection, tainted by political correctness, violence and obscenities, THE CHAMBER, nevertheless, contains some gripping and disturbing commentary which addresses some serious issues affecting our society today.

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