THE CLAIM Add To My Top 10

Greed in All its ‘Glory’

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 29, 2000

Starring: Wes Bentley, Milla Jovovich, Nastassja Kinski, Peter Mullan, & Sarah Polley

Genre: Western

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 119 minutes

Address Comments To:

Chairman or CEO
MGM/UA
2500 Broadway Street
Santa Monica, CA 90404-3061
(310) 449-3000

Content:

(HH, C, PaPa, LL, VV, SS, NN, AA, DD, M) Humanist worldview with mild Christian themes wherein several dramas & unnecessary subplots play out in a California Gold Rush-era mountain town plus themes of greed, lust, redemption, & punishment send very mixed messages in this mess of a movie; 10 obscenities & 3 blasphemies & some vulgarities & sexual talk; some intense violence, with stealing rebuked in a public whipping, man shot, two execution shotgun murders, fighting, explosion, brief scene of blood & body parts, running horse engulfed in flames; numerous brothel & saloon scenes, sexual talk, seduction, man fornicates with two women, & suggested masturbation; brief full female nudity; alcohol use & drunkenness; smoking & drug use; and, grief-induced death & greedy man sells wife & baby for gold.

Summary:

THE CLAIM is an examination of human depravity, subsequent consequences and the world’s idea of redemption (success) set in the California Gold Rush era in the 1800s. A fine ensemble cast, a reasonably good soundtrack and fantastic scenery (filming actually took place in Alberta, Canada) cannot save this movie from being agonizingly slow, confusing, shallow, immoral, abrupt, and corrupt.

Review:

THE CLAIM is an examination of human depravity, subsequent consequences and the world’s idea of redemption (worldly success).

In the story, a woman named Elena (Nastassja Kinski) and her daughter, Hope, travel to a California Gold Rush-era town to confront the man who sold them for gold 20 years earlier. Daniel Dillon (Peter Mullan), the husband, is the town’s wealthy owner, profiting from his successful brothel, saloon and bank in Kingdom Come. Dillon has even won the affections of an exotic prostitute named Lucia (Mila Jovovich). Also coming into town is Mr. Dalglish (Wes Bentley), a surveyor seeking the best location for the construction of the new trans-continental railroad while pursuing the affections of young Hope (Sarah Polley). Meanwhile, Lucia inherits the brothel, seduces Dalglish and decides to move her operation to a new town in the valley. Also, Dalglish’s assistant wants to marry the prostitute on whom he spends all his money.

This soap opera-thick script is bogged down as the movie cannot decide which story to feature and which to resolve. The conflicts are so artificially manufactured that viewers may be reminded of World Wrestling.

On the other hand, a few redemptive scenes are glimpsed. A husband and wife are reunited, a man shows mercy to another, a priest prays, and Scripture is heard at a wedding and funeral. Greed, however, is the primary focus of the movie, and it is alternately praised and rebuked. A town engulfed in flames at the end of the movie is intended to remind viewers of Hell’s flames, and the consequences of pursuing empty passions.

A fine ensemble cast, a reasonably good soundtrack and fantastic scenery (filming actually took place in Alberta, Canada) cannot save this movie from being agonizingly slow and shallow. THE CLAIM also suffers from unfocused shots, distracting hand-held camera shots, confusing flashback scenes, and abrupt editing. The story also contains some violence, sexuality, nudity, and other objectionable content. Don’t be fooled, THE CLAIM will lead you down a wayward path.

In Brief:

THE CLAIM is an examination of human depravity, subsequent consequences and the world’s idea of redemption (worldly success). In the story, a woman named Elena and her daughter, Hope, travel to a California Gold Rush-era town to confront the man who sold them for gold 20 years earlier. Daniel Dillon, the husband, is the town’s wealthy owner, profiting from his successful brothel, saloon and bank in Kingdom Come. Dillon has even won the affections of an exotic prostitute named Lucia. Also coming into town is Mr. Dalglish, a surveyor seeking the best location for the construction of the new trans-continental railroad while pursuing the affections of young Hope.

A fine ensemble cast, a reasonably good soundtrack and fantastic scenery (filming actually took place in Alberta, Canada) cannot save this movie from being agonizingly slow and shallow. THE CLAIM also suffers from unfocused shots, distracting hand-held camera shots, confusing flashback scenes, and abrupt editing. The story also contains some violence, sexuality, nudity, and other objectionable content. Greed is the primary focus of this movie, and it is alternately praised and rebuked. Don’t be fooled, THE CLAIM will lead you down a wayward path