THEY

Evil Overcomes Goodness

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 27, 2002

Starring: Laura Regan, Marc Blucas,
Ethan Embry, Jon Abrahams, and
Dagmara Dominczyk

Genre: Horror

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Dimension Films

Director: Robert Harmon

Executive Producer: Ted Field and Scott Kroopf

Producer: Tom Engelman

Writer: Brendan Hood

Address Comments To:

Bob Weinstein & Harvey Weinstein
Dimension Films
99 Hudson Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (212) 219-4100
Fax: (212) 941-3836
Website: www.dimensionfilms.com

Content:

(OOO, C, L, VV, S, NN, AA, D, M) Demonic worldview where demonic monsters defeat heroine and her friends and a woman wears crucifix and Christian priest appears at funeral reception; five obscenities (including one “f” word), two strong profanities, one mild profanity, and vomiting; very scary but not very gory violence where demonic monsters scare people, drag little boy under his bed, swarm over people, attack people, grab adults, and scare people during sleepwalking so that they lash out at other people, plus one suicide by gunshot; implied fornication; partial female and male nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking; and, deception.


Summary:

In the horror movie titled THEY, by demonic monsters from another world that live in darkness and fear the light threaten a young graduate student and her friends are threatened. The heroine and her friends lose and the movie implies that the evil monsters will always win, no matter what, which is an abhorrent viewpoint to say the least.


Review:

During its heyday in the Golden Age of Hollywood, Universal Studios made horror movies like DRACULA, FRANKENSTEIN, THE WOLFMAN, and THE MUMMY. At the end of each of these movies, the heroes destroy the monster. It was only in the sequels that the monster somehow survives, or is resuscitated.
In many contemporary horror movies, however, the monster does not die, and, sometimes, the heroes lose. That’s the case with the new horror movie, THEY.
In the movie’s story, Julia Lund is a young graduate student in psychology. She is getting ready to defend her master’s thesis, when she encounters an old friend, Bobby, forces her to revisit the night terrors they experienced as children. After witnessing Bobby commit suicide, Julia discovers that Bobby has two other friends who share their experience. Suddenly, it seems that demonic creatures from another world are stalking all three people. The monsters are afraid of the light and only come out at night.
THEY is well done at times, especially the acting performances, but it becomes a bit monotonous, predictable and silly at times. The movie also offers no explanation for the origin of the monsters.
Like too many of today’s horror movies, the demonic monsters in THEY win, and the heroine and her friends lose. In fact, the movie implies that the monsters will always defeat anyone who tries to get away from them or stop them. Thus, there seems to be no way that the heroine can win or escape. This represents an abhorrent worldview where darkness and evil prevail over the forces of goodness. Also, there are biblical and Christian implications to the struggle between good and evil in the movie that the filmmakers have decided not to really explore. For example, one of Bobby’s friends wears a crucifix, and a priest appears at Bobby’s funeral, but nothing more is made of these religious icons.
Contrary to the worldview in this movie, Paul teaches us in Romans 8 that nothing can separate us from the love of God that is in Jesus Christ. Not even scary monsters in horror movies.


In Brief:

In the horror movie THEY, Julia Lund is a young graduate student in psychology. She’s getting ready to defend her master’s thesis, when she encounters an old friend, Bobby, forces her to revisit the night terrors they experienced as children. After witnessing Bobby commit suicide, Julia discovers that Bobby has two other friends who share their experience. Suddenly, it seems that demonic creatures from another world are stalking all three people. The monsters are afraid of the light and only come out at night.
Like too many of today’s horror movies, the demonic monsters in THEY win, and the heroine and her friends lose. In fact, the movie implies that the monsters will always defeat anyone who tries to get away from them or stop them. This represents an abhorrent worldview where darkness and evil prevail over the forces of goodness. Also, there are biblical and Christian implications to the struggle between good and evil in the movie that the filmmakers have decided not to really explore. For example, one of Bobby’s friends wears a crucifix, and a priest appears at Bobby’s funeral, but nothing more is made of these religious icons