TIME CODE

Confusing Cameras, Shallow Center

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 28, 2000

Starring: Stellan Skarsgaard, Viveka
Davis, Salma Hayek, Holly
Hunter, Kyle MacLachlan,
Saffron Burrows, Glenne
Headly, Alessandro Nivola, &
Jeanne Tripplehorn

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Screen Gems/Sony Pictures
Entertainment

Director: Mike Figgis

Executive Producer:

Producer: Mike Figgis, Annie Stewart &
Dustin Bernard

Writer: Mike Figgis

Address Comments To:

John Calley, CEO
Sony Pictures Entertainment
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Website: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(PaPaPa, HoHo, LLL, VV, SS, AA, DD, MMM) Predominantly pagan worldview of characters seeking sensual pleasures regardless of others, plus strong lesbian characters; 23 obscenities, 3 profanities & some vulgarities; moderate violence of several earthquakes & woman shoots man with blood shown; some sexual references, heavy kissing between lesbian lovers, man takes woman’s underwear off under her skirt, couple fornicate behind screen showing footage of women auditioning for role by acting out sensual pleasure with male character, & sexual flirtations between two women interrupted by entrance of a man; no nudity but cleavage & some thigh briefly shown during sex; alcohol use & abuse; several instances of drug use; and, lying, cheating, blackmail, & deceit.

Summary:

TIME CODE is an independent movie that tells the story of a movie executive involved in a love triangle with a woman, who’s secretly wiretapped by her lesbian lover. Using hand-held digital cameras, TIME CODE follows it characters around for 90 minutes in realtime, dividing the screen into four sections, but the shiny, gimicky, often confusing technique cannot mask its shallow, ill-defined story, which contains numerous obscenities, profanities and sexual situations.

Review:

Imagine dividing a movie screen into four parts, each holding the footage from four different cameras. Now imagine that all of that footage forms one movie: TIME CODE. Touted by Screen Gems as “a revolutionary new look at motion picture storytelling,” it offers a unique aspect of filmmaking, though whether the style will take off or not is in question.

The staff of Red Mullet Productions (the actual production company of TIME CODE) is visited by a masseuse, an apparent “free trial” for the group. In a comedic way, as the group discusses upcoming productions, this masseuse works on each person, working out the knots in feet, backs, legs, arms, and necks, all while the meeting goes on among them. One executive, played by Holly Hunter, addresses the issue of a co-worker who is always late, but delivers when push comes to shove.

Alex Green is that very person, a movie executive whose wife, Emma (Saffron Burrows of DEEP BLUE SEA), has recently left him. An avid drinker, he is trying to attend to his job, though he is always late. Emma is seeing her therapist (played by Glenne Headly) and suffers from depression over her marriage. Alex meanwhile makes a phone call to Rose (Salma Hayek of DOGMA), an aspiring actress with whom he is having an affair. She answers him on her cell phone, agreeing to meet him later. Though Rose’s lesbian lover, Lauren (Jeanne Tripplehorn of MICKEY BLUE EYES), suspects Rose’s affair, Rose, who assures her of her fidelity, calms her. Yet, she is not thoroughly convinced, and hides a wireless microphone in Rose’s purse.

The team at Alex’s production company are working on screening prospects for their upcoming feature, “Louisiana B*tch.” Many young girls are auditioning for the part and the crew watch footage from these auditions, having trouble finding the right one. Meanwhile, Rose arrives at the production company to meet Alex. The two fornicate behind the screen, and an eavesdropping Lauren hears the sound from the audition footage, involving the women simulating sexual pleasure. Rose is found out, however, when the footage is shown, and she and Alex are still going at it. Hurt and angry, Lauren continues to listen to their conversation, contemplating drastic action.

Emma runs into one of the girls auditioning, and the two go back to the girl’s house. Emma is a bit nervous, and the girl tries to make her feel at ease by kissing her. Obviously uncomfortable by the girl’s intentions, Emma succumbs to her entreaties until a man walks into the house. Embarrassed and confused, Emma calls Alex to tell him she loves him, though it may be too late.

Many say that TIME CODE is a breakthrough in taking moviemaking into new realms. Director Mike Figgis (LEAVING LAS VEGAS and INTERNAL AFFAIRS) has divided the screen into four parts, using sound to direct the attention of the viewer. However, this method is not always clear, with the sound from two screens sometimes vying for attention. This rough, unique style leaves viewers either enthralled with a new technique or annoyed with trying to keep up with four different screens. Either way, this movie contains numerous obscenities, profanities and sexual situations, combined with a strong pagan worldview of characters seeking sensual pleasures regardless of others. TIME CODE also contains alcohol use and abuse, several instances of drug use and plenty of other immoral activity, including lying, cheating, blackmail, and deceit. On the outside, this may be a shiny, gimmicky and sometimes critically acclaimed movie, but on the inside it is a shallow, ill-defined story reflecting an absence of morality.

In Brief:

Imagine dividing a movie screen into four parts, each holding the footage from four different cameras. Now imagine that all of that footage forms one movie: TIME CODE. Touted as “a revolutionary new look at motion picture storytelling,” this movie tells the story of a movie executive involved in a love triangle with a woman, who’s secretly wiretapped by her lesbian lover. Meanwhile, the executive’s estranged wife has her own lesbian encounter, which is interrupted when a man enters the room. Embarrassed and confused, the wife calls her husband to tell him she loves him, though it may be too late.

This rough, unique style leaves viewers either enthralled or annoyed with trying to keep up with four different screens. Either way, this movie contains numerous obscenities, profanities and sexual situations, combined with a strong pagan worldview of characters seeking sensual pleasures regardless of others. TIME CODE also contains alcohol abuse, several instances of drug use and plenty of other immoral activity, including lying, cheating, blackmail, and deceit. On the outside, this may be a gimmicky and sometimes critically acclaimed movie, but on the inside it is a shallow, ill-defined story reflecting an absence of morality