ZOOM

Tool Time for Super Kids

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 11, 2006

Starring: Tim Allen, Courteney Cox,
Chevy Chase, Spencer Breslin,
Kevin Zegers, Kate Mara,
Michael Cassidy, Ryan Newman,
and Rip Torn

Genre: Superhero Comedy

Audience: Children

Rating: PG

Runtime: 91 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures

Director: Peter Hewitt

Executive Producer: Trevor Engelson, Neil A.
Machlis and Nick Osborne

Producer: Todd Garner, Jennifer Todd and
Suzanne Todd

Writer: Adam Rifkin and David
Berenbaum

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton
Chairman and CEO
Sony Pictures Entertainment
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000
Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(B, C, V) Moral worldview about good vs. bad super powers, with a military man willing to radiate children and some Christian content; no obscenities nor profanities; some slapstick violence, man struck by lightning (not fatal), man slimed by snot, and girls splattered with chili; no sex; and, no nudity.

Summary:

ZOOM is a clean wholesome kids show that features Tim Allen’s signature style of comedy in a story that is less that original. If you’re less than 13 years old, you might find the movie enjoyable.

Review:

ZOOM is a clean wholesome kids show that features Tim Allen’s signature style of comedy in a story that is less that original. Allen plays a former super hero named “Zoom.” He used to be very fast. He is called out of retirement to train a group of children with superpowers so they can save the world from an approaching threat. The children include a teenage boy who can disappear (Michael Cassidy) and teenage girl who can levitate objects (Kate Mara), an eight-year-old boy who expands from plump to enormous (Spencer Breslin) and a six-year-old girl with super strength (Ryan Newman). Courteney Cox plays a clumsy technician at the training center and Chevy Chase is underutilized as a scientist at the facility.

Allen is reluctant in his work because as a child in the same program he and the other children in the program were given radiation treatments to enhance their powers. This led to his own loss of powers and to his brother going to the dark side and using his powers for evil.

Predictable gags abound in finding and selecting the children to include in the program. The middle of the movie slows to a crawl as the children are being trained and the conclusion is so predictable they could have filmed it without a script. If you’re less than 13 years old, however, you might find the movie enjoyable.

Where are the scriptwriters capable of creating amazing new adventures for family audiences? Do they all work for Pixar?

To the movie’s credit it contains no bad language or sex and the violence is mild slapstick super hero variety. The filmmakers even avoided the use of nightmare inducing villains. The filmmakers were clearly not after Academy Awards, they were out to make something children can enjoy and parents can feel good about taking their children to see. For this, we commend them.

In Brief:

ZOOM is a clean wholesome children’s movie that features Tim Allen’s signature style of comedy in a story that is less that original. Allen plays a former super hero called out of retirement to train a group of children with superpowers so they can save the world from an approaching threat. Allen plays a former super hero named “Zoom.” Allen is reluctant because as a child in the same program he and the other children were given radiation treatments to enhance their powers. This led to his loss of powers, and to his brother using his powers for evil.

Predictable gags abound. The middle of the movie slows to a crawl and the conclusion is so predictable they could have filmed it without a script. If you’re less than 13 years old, however, you might find the movie enjoyable. To the movie’s credit it contains no bad language or sex, and the violence is mild slapstick. The filmmakers even avoided the use of nightmare inducing villains. The filmmakers were clearly out to make something children can enjoy and parents can feel good about taking their children to see. Thus, we commend them.