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Medical Experts Concerned Over TikTok Self-Diagnosis Videos

Photo by Olivier Bergeron via Unsplash

Medical Experts Concerned Over TikTok Self-Diagnosis Videos

By Movieguide® Staff

As TikTok continues to grow in popularity, young users began to question some of the harmful trends spread like wildfire among the video-sharing app’s 1 billion users.

In an interview with CBS 7, high school student Matthew Jude Fanous took note of TikTok’s addictive qualities.

“It took a lot of time away from my school and a lot of time away from my friends, which is really weird,” Fanous told the outlet.

The high school student said you could find videos on whatever topic you want, which poses a central problem: what information is accurate?

Ironically, TikTok videos that help users self-diagnose mental health issues have become popular.

Kristi Edwards, the CEO of Centers for Children and Families, said that this often spreads false information and harmful behavior.

“You start living what you think that you have,” Edwards told CBS 7. “The chances of you having one of these serious mental illnesses without having prior symptomology are very slim.”

However, as the reasons to show discernment grow for TikTok users and their parents, a recent study found that younger generations are abandoning social media.

Movieguide® previously reported:

According to a handful of recent surveys, Gen Z is turning its back on major social media platforms like TikTok and Instagram.

A Fall 2021 survey conducted by investment bank Piper Sandler revealed that only 22% of those surveyed—between the ages of 7 and 22—named Instagram their favorite app.

In Spring 2020, that same number was up at 31%.

“When you delete it you realize you don’t need it,” 20-year-old Gabriella Steinerman told The New York Post of her motivation to stop using TikTok and Instagram in 2019.

“When I was posting I wanted the best photo that I took and the best angle and I had 20 different photos of the same thing. I was comparing myself to myself, it’s not a fun game,” Steinerman added. “I would say it’s an obsessive behavior and it is toxic, but it’s also sneaky in that when you do it, it seems so normal.”