MEET THE FOCKERS

Content:

(PaPa, PCPC, B, LLL, V, SS, NN, AA, DD, MM) Strong pagan, politically correct worldview preaches sexual liberation, permissiveness and New Age “interfaith” ideas when cleric with a collar and a yarmulke marries young couple, but retains some conservative morality and skepticism; 16 obscenities, two strong profanities, 12 light profanities, dog flushed down toilet, obscene gesture, and many allusions to “f” words; light slapstick violence includes engaged couple’s parents play touch football and some pratfalls; implied pre-marital sex, unmarried young woman announces she’s pregnant, dog does lewd movements on cat and people’s legs, and breast-fed baby gets excited when he sees big breasts; people on bus flash upper female nudity and rear nudity to passing car, and grandfather shows replica of daughter’s breast that he uses to feed her baby; alcohol use and drunkenness; references to smoking marijuana and young man is given truth serum; and, lying, secrecy, spying on people, and some parental permissiveness mocked and rebuked but not all. GENRE: Comedy

Summary:

MEET THE FOCKERS picks up where MEET THE PARENTS left off, with Greg deciding it’s time for his parents to meet his future in laws. This sequel is funnier than the original, but it still contains much crude humor and a pagan, permissive worldview.

Review:

MEET THE FOCKERS picks up where MEET THE PARENTS left off. In the sequel, Ben Stiller’s character, Greg, has finally popped the question to his girlfriend, Pam. Although he still doesn’t get along with his potential father-in-law, Jack Byrnes (played by Robert De Niro), he has decided it’s time for his parents to meet Pam’s parents. Instead of flying down to South Florida, Jack drives them down in his new super-duper RV. He and his wife are babysitting their other daughter’s two-year-old, whom the over-protective grandfather has been trying to teach sign language.
Of course, when they get to Greg’s parents’ house, Greg’s super-relaxed, permissive parents, Bernie and Roz (played by Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand), grate on Jack’s nerves and vice versa. No matter how hard Greg and Pam try, the parents can’t seem to get along. What they don’t know is that Jack thinks that, when Greg was a teenager, he fathered an illegitimate son by his family’s Mexican housekeeper.
This sequel is funnier than the original, but it still contains a lot of crude humor. For example, there are many crude breast jokes because Grandfather Jack has made a model of his daughter’s breast so her baby will be more comfortable while feeding. Also, Greg accidentally teaches the baby a dirty word, which the baby often repeats, and the movie has many crude references to “f” words. Finally, the movie has a pagan, New Age worldview that validates the hedonistic sex therapy that Greg’s mother practices. Although the movie makes it clear that Greg’s parents are too permissive, their permissive attitude is ultimately validated over Jack’s strict disciplinarianism and paranoia.

In Brief:

MEET THE FOCKERS picks up where MEET THE PARENTS left off. In the sequel, Ben Stiller’s character, Greg, has finally popped the question to his girlfriend, Pam. Although he still doesn’t get along with his potential father-in-law, Jack Byrnes (played by Robert De Niro), he has decided it’s time for his parents to meet Pam’s parents. Of course, when they get to Greg’s parents’ house, Greg’s super-relaxed, permissive parents, Bernie and Roz (played by Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand), grate on Jack’s nerves and vice versa. This sequel is funnier than the original, but it still contains much crude humor. For example, there are many crude breast jokes because Grandfather Jack has made a model of his daughter’s breast so her baby will be more comfortable while feeding. Also, Greg accidentally teaches the baby a dirty word, which the baby often repeats, and the movie has many crude references to “f” words. Finally, the movie has a pagan, New Age worldview that validates the permissive view of Greg’s parents. Although the movie makes it clear that Greg’s parents are too permissive, their permissive attitude is ultimately validated over Jack’s strict disciplinarianism and paranoia.