CLICK

"Family Comes First"

Quality:
Content: -2 Discretion advised for adults.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

CLICK, Adam Sandler's new comedy, has a moral message, marred by a liberal attitude. Adam Sandler as Michael Newman, a Jewish architect who is trying to become partner at his firm, but his boss keeps taking him away from time with his family. In the Beyond Department of a Bed, Bath and Beyond store, a ruffled attendant gives Michael the latest, most mysterious universal remote. Michael uses the remote to fast forward through his family life and get a promotion. The remote starts automatically speeding up through the kinds of family time that he started skipping earlier. Michael soon finds himself losing whole years of his life, which gets darker and darker the older he gets.

CLICK is like one of those comical TWILIGHT ZONE episodes where the character makes a deal with the Devil but gets more than he bargained. Like those episodes, it delivers a couple positive moral messages at the end. There are, however, several visual references to dogs trying to have sex with toys and a couple human sex scenes done in silhouette. The movie is also full of foul language throughout, including one “f” word.

Content:

(PaPa, B, FR, M) Mixed pagan worldview with light moral elements and moral premise in a theologically liberal Jewish family, including a couple references and allusions to God and supernatural powers, a moral message that family comes before work, plus off-color humor and plenty of foul language as selfish protagonist must go through some hard life lessons; 27 obscenities, including one “f” word and one “f” word cut off, two or three strong profanities, and six light profanities; light comic violence; depicted animal lust and depicted sex between married couple in silhouette, plus joke about woman getting a sex change operation; upper male nudity and rear male nudity in silhouette; alcohol use; smoking ; and, lying, father neglects his family and boss manipulates a colleague.

More Detail:

CLICK, Adam Sandler’s new comedy, has many allusions to that great family movie classic, IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE. Regrettably, it’s also got a contemporary, liberal attitude that allows for a lot of off-color jokes and foul language. The main moral message of the movie is that family comes first.

In the story, Sandler plays young Jewish architect Michael Newman. Michael is trying to become partner at his firm, but his boss keeps taking him away from time with his family.

Trouble with all the remotes in the house inspires a frustrated Michael to make a late-night trip to get a “universal remote.” The electronic stores are closed, however, and Michael ends up at Bed, Bath and Beyond. After lying down on one of their display beds for a moment, Michael notices a door labeled “Beyond.” There, he meets a ruffled service attendant named Morty, played by Christopher Walken, who gives Michael the latest, most mysterious universal remote you ever saw.

Back home, Michael learns that the remote is a real universal remote. He starts using the remote to mute the barks of the family pet dog, to speed through arguments with his wife and to speed through the boring parts of his family life. Michael uses the remote to close a big deal with some Japanese clients, but his boss delays his promised promotion until Michael finishes the designs for the deal. So, Michael speeds up his life until he gets to his promotion.

Back home, however, the remote starts automatically speeding up through the kinds of family time that he started skipping earlier. Michael soon finds himself skipping whole years of his life, which gets darker and darker the older he gets.

CLICK is like one of those comical TWILIGHT ZONE episodes where the character makes a deal with the Devil but gets more than he bargained. Like those episodes, it delivers a couple positive moral messages at the end. There are, however, several visual references to dogs trying to have sex with toys and a couple human sex scenes done in silhouette. The movie is also full of foul language throughout, including one “f” word.

As the movie’s moral premise notes, family does indeed come first; but, as Christians know, God and Jesus Christ come before family.

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