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JOY RIDE (2023)

"Vile Raunchy Ride with Many Stupid, Witless Jokes"

What You Need To Know:

JOY RIDE is an extreme R-rated comedy with an Asian cast. Four young Chinese American women get into lots of comical trouble in Communist China when three of them visit an actress friend. Lolo convinces her childhood friend, Audrey, to search for her birth mother. Audrey was born in Beijing and adopted by two white Americans. She goes looking for the adoption agency that handled her birth mother’s case. The four women get in trouble with a professional basketball team of foreigners in Beijing. They also run into a white female drug dealer who steals their money, clothes and passports.

JOY RIDE has nice scenes about friendship and Audrey looking for her birth mother. However, the rest of it has a strong pagan worldview filled with lewd, obscene content. It includes lots of strong foul language, unfunny hedonistic sexual behavior and comments, substance abuse, and explicit nudity. JOY RIDE is an abhorrent raunchy comedy. The movie’s uplifting scenes can’t erase all the evil hedonistic shenanigans designed to shock and titillate moviegoers. Discerning, smart and wise viewers will not find JOY RIDE amusing.

Content:

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Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Very strong pagan, mostly hedonistic worldview in a comedy about four young women engaged in raunchy comical behavior in Communist China (three of the women are Chinese Americans visiting the country, and the fourth is a Chinese American who’s working as an actress in China), with some moral elements where one of the women is searching for her birth mother (she was adopted from Beijing by a white American couple), and the actress is engaged to her Christian costar in a TV soap opera (the movie doesn’t mock his faith per se, but it does depict his commitment to be chaste with his fiancée as comically impossible), plus some light Pro-American, pro-capitalist elements but movie generally avoids the political issue of China’s authoritarian communist regime

Foul Language:
At least 107 obscenities (including many “f” words, more than half), two Jesus profanities, two GD profanities, 10 light profanities, some vomiting, and one or two obscene gestures

Violence:
Some comical violence includes male athlete injures himself during an informal dance competition, woman mistakenly uses a massage gun on a man’s groin while she’s in the throes of passion during a sex sequence, some comical slapping, an Asian girl punches a white boy who uses a racial, slur while they’re on the playground, and people watch a scene being shot for a TV program where a character commits suicide by slitting his throat with blood shown

Sex:
Extreme sexual content includes scenes of depicted fornication and oral sex, man uses a massage gun to get a woman aroused in a gym, and she mistakenly uses it on his groin while in the throes of passion, another woman goes to bed with two male athletes, one young woman dresses like a male, and she may be transgender, but the other women just call her weird, passionate kissing, a woman on a television program in China is engaged to her co-star on the show, but they say they are holding off on sex because the man is a Christian (the other characters think this is weird, but otherwise they don’t mock his alleged faith), lead female character’s female friend is crude and works as a an artists who specializes in sexually explicit art (some of her pieces are shown), and many crude and even graphic sexual comments and some gestures,

Nudity:
Full frontal female nudity reveals woman has a tattoo around her genitals and there’s some upper and rear female nudity and upper and rear male nudity

Alcohol Use:
Alcohol use and drunkenness

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
No smoking, but there’s an extended scene where four women have to swallow Ecstasy pills, snort cocaine and hide drugs in their rectum when a white woman selling drugs in Communist China frames them with her stash and steals their money and passports, and this scene is followed up with some drug jokes; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Young woman’s close childhood friend gets jealous of the woman’s old college roommate, and a white woman who sells drugs in China dupes four Asian American women, stealing their money, clothes and passports while leaving them her drug stash and framing them as being drug dealers with Chinese police.

More Detail:

JOY RIDE is an extreme R-rated comedy about four young Chinese American women who get into all sorts of comical trouble in Communist China when three of them visit an actress friend and one of them goes searching for her birth mother. JOY RIDE has some nice scenes about the one woman looking for her birth mother, but the rest of the movie has a strong pagan worldview filled with lewd and obscene content, including lots of strong foul language, unfunny hedonistic sexual behavior and comments, substance abuse, and explicit nudity.

The movie opens with two of the women meeting one another on a playground when they were children. A white American couple adopted one of the women, Audrey, who was born in Beijing. Audrey’s new friend, Lolo, has Chinese parents. The parents use an “f” word. Later, on the playground, Lolo uses an “f” word and punches a white boy when he uses a racial slur.

Twenty years later or more, Audrey is a corporate lawyer working for a white law firm. Lolo considers herself an artist, but all of her works have explicit sexual themes.

Audrey’s boss decides to send her to Beijing, where she was born, to meet with an important potential client, a rich Chinese businessman. The trip represents a chance for Audrey and Lolo to make their long-planned trip to their native land. Lolo, who will be Audrey’s translator, also sees the trip as a chance for Audrey to find her birth mother. Also, Audrey will be able to visit her old college roommate, Kat, who’s now working on a popular Chinese soap opera which is set centuries ago. Lolo is a little jealous of Kat. Also, she brings her oddball cousin, Deadeye, a young woman who dresses in a masculine way (the character is played by a “nonbinary” actress). The cousin is nicknamed Deadeye because of her dreadful, challenging stare of disapproval.

To their surprise, when the three woman visit Kat, they learn she’s engaged to her Chinese costar, a devout Christian. Kat and her fiancé have decided to remain abstinent before their marriage. The move has a little fun with this when they share an extra-passionate kiss when Kat leaves her fiancé to hang with Audrey and her friends.

That night, an informal meeting with the rich businessman goes comically wrong, and Audrey loses the deal. The next day, Lolo makes Audrey go to the adoption agency that handled her adoption. The agency tells Audrey that the original files are located in a slightly rural town miles away. Kat agrees to travel there with Audrey, Lolo and Deadeye.

That night, the four “ladies” hook up with an English-speaking team from the Chinese Basketball Association, who agree to give the girls a ride to the rural town. One of the players is an old college boyfriend of Kat’s, about whom Kat never told her fiancé. Later, Kat cheats on her fiancé with the man, while Lolo has bawdy rendezvous affair with one player in the hotel gym, and Audrey beds two of the players together in her room. Down in the bar, meanwhile, a drunken Deadeye engages in a dance-off with one another player.

The next morning, all four players show up suffering injuries because of the night’s escapades, and the women no longer have a ride. They must take the train. However, on the train, the women have their money and passports stolen by a white woman. Making matters worse, the woman turns out to be a drug dealer. It turns out she left them with all her stash and called the police on them. The four women end up having to use the drugs, ingest the drugs and hide them in their anus. They fool the cops, but the police throw them off the train because they have no passports.

Stranded on a rural road in China, how will the women get to the town to find out about Audrey’s birth mother. Also, how will they make it to the United States?

JOY RIDE has some nice scenes about Audrey looking for her birth mother. There are also two or so nice scenes about friendship. However, the rest of the movie has a strong hedonistic, pagan worldview. It’s filled with lewd and obscene content, including lots of strong foul language, unfunny hedonistic sexual behavior and comments, substance abuse, and explicit nudity. For example, JOY RIDE doesn’t include foul language in every scene, but it has at least 121 obscenities and profanities, including many “f” words and four strong profanities. The movie also contains much lewd dialogue. Finally, one of its biggest alleged laughs relies on an image of explicit genital nudity.

JOY RIDE is an abhorrent raunchy comedy. The movie’s more uplifting scenes can’t erase all the evil hedonistic shenanigans designed to shock and titillate moviegoers. Sadly, the movie is being geared for a blockbuster release. Hopefully, American and overseas moviegoers will not be fooled and reject this wicked, unfunny ride. Discerning, smart and wise viewers will not find JOY RIDE amusing, much less worthwhile. Many of the jokes are stupid and witless, not just vile.


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