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MOXIE

"Overt Politically Correct Agenda"

Quality:
Content: -4 Gross immorality, and/or worldview problems.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

Netflix’s MOXIE begins with a new school year. The first day of 11th grade finds 16-year-old Vivian trying to find her way in life and not become stressed about the future. At school, Vivian realizes it’s the same old song and dance for her peers, but the young women don’t get treated with the same respect as the men in the school. Vivian anonymously writes a feminist manifesto called Moxie. She hopes her manifesto will start a revolution that changes things for the better. However, will Vivian’s idea backfire?

MOXIE is well made, but strong politically correct, radical feminist messages become the center of the action. The lead character, Vivian’s, heart may be in the right place for wanting women treated with respect, but her methods cause an uproar. Discerning viewers might wonder if there are better ways for Vivian to make her point. MOXIE also contains one scene where two teenage females kiss, a New Age comment, teenage alcohol abuse, and strong immoral references to teenage sexuality. These elements, plus lots of gratuitous foul language, make MOXIE unacceptable for media-wise viewers.

Content:

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Dominant Worldview and Other Worldview Content/Elements:
Very strong Romantic, politically correct, feminist worldview where, although the lead character’s heart may be in the right place for wanting women to be treated with fairness and respect, her methods, and those of her cohorts, as with many similar protest antics, cause an uproar that makes media-wise viewers wonder if there’s a better way to make their point, plus two teen females kiss in one scene, one New Age comment about the universe, and Christian imagery in a funeral home chapel

Foul Language:
About 34 obscenities (including one “f” word), two strong Jesus profanities, 15 light profanities (mainly OMG), a couple of shuts ups, and a teenage boy spits in someone’s soda

Violence:
Light violence includes a news anchor mentions sexual harassment, a female teenager confesses to getting raped, and a drunken teen falls off a trampoline

Sex:
Strong and light sexual content includes two female teenagers kiss, teenagers kiss on the lips and almost fornicate in the back of a parked car, and some sexual innuendo and references such as talk about a lewd list teenage boys make each year with, for example, the boys naming who is the “Best A**” or “the most bangable” on campus

Nudity:
Upper male nudity, and some male and female midriffs shown

Alcohol Use:
Mention of DUIs, underage drinking and teenage drunkenness

Smoking and/or Drug Use and Abuse:
No smoking or drugs, but principal mentions drugs when she talks about what she has to deal with in her job; and,

Miscellaneous Immorality:
Strong miscellaneous immorality includes sexism but rebuked, disrespectful teens, teenage boy slaps a peer’s behind, teenage girl jokes about being pregnant to scare her mother, theft and defacing school property.

More Detail:

MOXIE follows a high school teenager who wants her male peers to treat women with respect and anonymously creates the activist club Moxie to do so. Streaming on Netflix, MOXIE is well made and directed, but, despite its positive message about treating other people fairly, it has strong, abhorrent politically correct, radical feminist elements, lots of gratuitous foul language, and strong references to teenage sexuality, all of which make it unacceptable for media-wise viewers.

MOXIE begins with a new school year. The first day of 11th grade finds 16-year-old Vivian trying to find her way in life and not become stressed about the future. At school on the first day, Vivian and her best friend, Claudia, talk about the impending list that’s going to come out. In this list, the high schoolers are classified with titles like “Best A**” and other lewd things of the like/ For now, however, all they really need to worry about is getting to class.

In English, viewers meet Lucy, a new teenager on the scene. When the English teacher asks them about their summer reading of THE GREAT GATSBY, Lucy posits a different point of view than her peers. For instance, she asks why can’t they read books not written by a rich white man. This rubs the class jock, Mitchell, the wrong way. Later, Mitchell subtly states that Lucy better get on his page while she’s getting a soda. Lucy goes to the principal to report Mitchell’s behavior as harassment, but the female principal dismisses Lucy’s concerns.

All this back and forth makes Vivian wonder about the status quo and whether there is any injustice at her school.

At a football pep rally at the high school, the lewd list goes live. Students gravitate to their phones only to be either distraught by others’ opinions or comment on the assigned titles of their peers. Vivian literally gets up in the middle of the rally and leaves, determined to do something about the horrific antics that plague her high school. Vivian’s mother was something of an amateur activist for females in her day. So, drawing from her mother’s old journals and photos, Vivian makes a Moxie manifesto of sorts that celebrates women and will hopefully call her classmates to a higher standard of appreciation for the opposite sex.

The next day, Vivian brings 50 copies of the Moxie booklet she made and puts them in the ladies’ bathroom. Soon thereafter, the Moxie copies start to circulate through the school. This generates both an appeal and a disdain for Vivian’s cause.

Will Vivian’s efforts be enough to show naysayers that women deserve appreciation and respect?

MOXIE is well directed by SNL alumna Amy Poehler, who also produces and stars in the movie as the mother. MOXIE carries some similarities to Poehler’s work in MEAN GIRLS, which exposed the toxic behavior of teenage girls toward one another. This time, however, teenage boys aren’t off the hook, and their behavior is also criticized. The plot points in the script are stationed well throughout MOXIE. In addition, the movie’s character arcs are also clear.

Sadly, though, MOXIE has a strong, abhorrent Romantic, politically correct, radical feminist worldview. Feminist and politically correct messages become the center of the action. Also, though the lead character’s heart may be in the right place for wanting women to be treated with fairness and respect, her methods, as with many similar protest antics, cause an uproar. This makes discerning viewers wonder if there’s a better way for Vivian to make her point about treating women fairly and respectfully. MOXIE also contains one scene where two teenage females kiss, a New Age comment about the universe, some discussions about losing one’s virginity, dysfunctional family portrayals, some teenage alcohol abuse, disrespect for others, and other negative content. All these bad elements, plus lots of gratuitous foul language, make MOXIE an unacceptable movie for media-wise viewers.