THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS

"The Beatles Like They’ve Never Been Seen Before"

Quality:
Content: -2 Discretion advised for adults.
NoneLightModerateHeavy
Language
Violence
Sex
Nudity

What You Need To Know:

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS is a documentary directed by Ron Howard about one of the world’s most iconic bands, the Beatles. The movie starts in 1963 when The Beatles have already become a sensation. They state that people thought that they were an overnight sensation, but they weren’t. It took immense practice and thousands of hours of playing together to create their unique sound, but once they did, their popularity exploded like no one had ever seen.

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS is an interesting look into the Beatles, with some fascinating behind the scenes footage and recordings. There’s not much jeopardy, so it’s targeted for the Beatles fan or avid music enthusiast. There are positive moral lessons in their friendship, especially in their early years as they learned to grow up quickly together and take on the world. However, there’s also some elements of idolatry shown in how people put the Beatles even above God in their hearts. THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A NIGHT also has some foul language that warrants caution.

Content:

(PaPa, B, Ab, V, L, S, N, A, DD) Moderate pagan worldview of band members pursuing glory and fame and fans worshipping them, mitigated by moral elements of friendship, and band members using their fame for some good, and band member makes reference about them being more popular than Jesus, but this receives negative attention and forces him to explain his comments; seven obscenities (including two “f” words) and one profanity; some news footage of civil rights protests and police brutality; no sexual content, but brief reference to a “dirty” city with quick shot of a brothel; upper male nudity; light drinking; smoking of cigarettes, and a reference to marijuana; no other immoral content.

More Detail:

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS is a documentary directed by Ron Howard about one of the world’s most iconic bands, covering 1963-1966 and the 250 concerts they performed in those three short years.

The movie starts at 1963 where The Beatles have already become a sensation. They state that people thought that they were an overnight sensation, but they weren’t. It took immense practice and thousands of hours of playing together to create their unique sound, but once they did, their popularity exploded like no one had ever seen.

The entirety of the movie covers the years they spent touring the world. Very little is said about their early years and upbringing, and their infamous breakup as a band isn’t covered. While countless hours could be spent exploring the band, Director Ron Howard focuses on what it was like for four young men to become some of the most famous pop-stars in the world, and how that popularity played out in society.

After experiencing wild success in their homeland, England, the group decided to take the risk of going to America. Little did they know how popular they would become. Already used to screaming fans, ecstatic young girls fainting at their sight, and mobs of people rushing for them, the level of fandom in America was exponentially greater. At some concerts, hundreds of people, many of whom were young people, were injured just from the chaos of their presence. While much of this was happening during the social unrest of the Civil Rights movement, the Beatles were adamant that they played for everyone, and would not support segregation at any of their concerts.

While the four men, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr were witty, enthusiastic and enjoyed the spotlight, their celebrity began to wear on them. In one instance while performing at a baseball stadium in New York City in front of 50,000 fans, the noise was so loud the band members could hardly hear themselves play. When it got to the point where they had to travel in heavy duty meat trucks to get around safely, the band members had had enough, and wanted to only focus on their music.

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK is an interesting look into the life of the Beatles, with some fascinating behind the scenes footage and recordings. There’s not much jeopardy or drama, so the movie’s targeted for the Beatles fan or avid music enthusiast.

There are some positive moral lessons in their friendship, especially in their early years as they learned to grow up quickly together and take on the world. When their fame escalates, there is a point where John Lennon says The Beatles are more popular or influential than Jesus Christ. This lands them in hot water, and many people across America begin to boycott them. In some press interviews from the 60s, Lennon attempts to explain his comments, and in a current interview McCartney states that all of the members had grown up in religious homes and says that they weren’t Anti-Jesus. The main point, however, is true, and relevant to today. The Beatles had the hearts of so many young people, including Christians, that their influence was stronger than the Church. It’s a sad thing to acknowledge, but not untrue, even in today’s pop culture.

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A NIGHT has some foul language that warrants caution.

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