A MIGHTY WIND

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 16, 2003

Starring: Christopher Guest, Eugene
Levy, Michael McKean,
Catherine O'Hara, Fred
Willard, Harry Shearer, Jane
Lynch, Parker Posey, and Bob
Balaban

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults REVIEWER:
Don Patton with Lisa
Rice Christopher Guest,
creator of the "mock-umentary"
genre, has introduced his
fourth in a series of movies
that will probably all go down
in history as cult classics.
Building on the reputations of
the previous three, THIS IS
SPINAL TAP (1984), WAITING FOR
GUFFMAN (1996), and BEST IN
SHOW (2000), Guest's latest
submission, A MIGHTY WIND,
doesn't quite deliver as many
laughs. In A MIGHTY WIND, a
folk music legend passes away
and is survived by his three
children who throw a
nationally televised reunion
tour in his honor. The
audience follows three musical
groups through their stories
of success, failure and
overall drama in the folk
music category that was so
popular in the 1960s. MIGHTY
WIND does offer a couple of
belly laughs. Creators
Christopher Guest and Eugene
Levy have a great talent at
poking fun at self-important
people, especially people who
take too seriously a hobby or
otherwise silly distraction
making it the center of their
world in a way that they
believe everyone should agree
with their excitement and in
turn share the obsession. A
70s metal band in SPINAL TAP,
a small town Founder's Day
play in GUFFMAN, dog shows in
BEST OF SHOW, and now folk
singing. . . really bad folk
singing. He's basically
recycled the same actors from
BEST IN SHOW. Directors do
this all the time. Where A
MIGHTY WIND fell flat was in
the,
OK-we-get-it!-We've-seen-Fred-Willard-act-like-a-goofball
category. The humor wasn't
quite fresh enough. Moral
audiences will want to know
that the movie has several
sexual comments, transvestite
humor, and mocking of
wholesomeness to one degree or
another. Due to the subject
matter of the movie, however,
the obscenities are
practically nonexistent. The
movie gets a PG-13 rating
because the subtle and
not-so-subtle lewd content is
not in short supply. It is
sort of snuck in through a few
dirty jokes and little winks
from the characters. For
example, a female backup
singer in one of the groups
tells how she was a porno film
star without using the word
pornography. The movie's
clever creators scripted her
to share great detail about
her experiences without making
a priest blush. It was quite
obvious what she was talking
about as her hopelessly
clueless and wholesome husband
watched, smiling vacantly at
the camera. One character was
a model train enthusiast who
built a small town in his
basement: complete with a
brothel. Finally, a lyric to
one of the folk songs has a
strong sexual reference, but
the audience has to listen for
it. Overall, there are no
overtly redeeming qualities
that would compel
Judeo-Christian families to
rally to the box office on
this one. Please address your
comments to: Barry M. Meyer,
Chairman/CEO Warner Bros.,
Inc. 4000 Warner
Blvd. Burbank, CA
91522-0001 Phone: (818)
954-6000 Website:
www.movies.warnerbros.com

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 87 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director: Christopher Guest

Executive Producer:

Producer: Karen Murphy

Writer: Christopher Guest and Eugene
Levy

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Pa, Ro, L, S, M) Generally pagan worldview with some mocking of morality, and some relativistic, romantic elements with character's choices; language includes one obscenity in a folk song and some off color jokes and sexual innuendoes, including transvestite humor; and, mocking of wholesomeness, parody of folk music era in the 1960s.

GENRE: Comedy

Pa

Ro

L

S

M

Summary:

A MIGHTY WIND is a "mock-umentary" that captures the reunion of 1960s folk trio the Folksmen (Guest, McKean, Shearer) as they prepare for a show at The Town Hall to memorialize a recently deceased concert promoter. With subtle sexual innuendos, the movie regrettably mocks morality in some spots.

Review:

Christopher Guest, creator of the "mock-umentary" genre, has introduced his fourth in a series of movies that will probably all go down in history as cult classics. Building on the reputations of the previous three, THIS IS SPINAL TAP (1984), WAITING FOR GUFFMAN (1996), and BEST IN SHOW (2000), Guest's latest submission, A MIGHTY WIND, doesn't quite deliver as many laughs.

In A MIGHTY WIND, a folk music legend passes away and is survived by his three children who throw a nationally televised reunion tour in his honor. The audience follows three musical groups through their stories of success, failure and overall drama in the folk music category that was so popular in the 1960s.

MIGHTY WIND does offer a couple of belly laughs. Creators Christopher Guest and Eugene Levy have a great talent at poking fun at self-important people, especially people who take too seriously a hobby or otherwise silly distraction making it the center of their world in a way that they believe everyone should agree with their excitement and in turn share the obsession. A 70s metal band in SPINAL TAP, a small town Founder's Day play in GUFFMAN, dog shows in BEST OF SHOW, and now folk singing. . . really bad folk singing. He's basically recycled the same actors from BEST IN SHOW. Directors do this all the time.

Where A MIGHTY WIND fell flat was in the, OK-we-get-it!-We've-seen-Fred-Willard-act-like-a-goofball category. The humor wasn't quite fresh enough. Moral audiences will want to know that the movie has several sexual comments, transvestite humor, and mocking of wholesomeness to one degree or another. Due to the subject matter of the movie, however, the obscenities are practically nonexistent.

The movie gets a PG-13 rating because the subtle and not-so-subtle lewd content is not in short supply. It is sort of snuck in through a few dirty jokes and little winks from the characters. For example, a female backup singer in one of the groups tells how she was a porno film star without using the word pornography. The movie's clever creators scripted her to share great detail about her experiences without making a priest blush. It was quite obvious what she was talking about as her hopelessly clueless and wholesome husband watched, smiling vacantly at the camera. One character was a model train enthusiast who built a small town in his basement: complete with a brothel. Finally, a lyric to one of the folk songs has a strong sexual reference, but the audience has to listen for it.

Overall, there are no overtly redeeming qualities that would compel Judeo-Christian families to rally to the box office on this one.

Please address your comments to:

Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO

Warner Bros., Inc.

4000 Warner Blvd.

Burbank, CA 91522-0001

Phone: (818) 954-6000

Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

SUMMARY: A MIGHTY WIND is a "mock-umentary" that captures the reunion of 1960s folk trio the Folksmen (Guest, McKean, Shearer) as they prepare for a show at The Town Hall to memorialize a recently deceased concert promoter. With subtle sexual innuendos, the movie regrettably mocks morality in some spots.

In Brief: