BLUE

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 30, 1993

Starring: Juliette Binoche, Benoit
Regent, Florence Pernel,
Charlotte Very, Helene
Vincent, & Philippe Volter

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Films

Director: Krzysztof Kieslowski

Executive Producer:

Producer: Marin Karmitz

Writer: Krzysztof Kieslowski &
Krzysztof Piesiewicz

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Content:

(H, B, SS, NN) Humanistic worldview with some biblical principles and references; prostitution, fornication & implied adultery; and, female nudity.

Summary:

The film BLUE explores the depths of depression in a very touching and credible way. After Julie falls into a deep depression following her husband's and daughter's deaths in a car accident, she cuts herself off from all memories of her former life. It is only when she renews her link with the past and love that she rids herself of this depression. Regrettably, the film is marred by nudity, fornication, and implied adultery which add nothing to the redemptive storyline.

Review:

The film BLUE explores the depths of depression in a very touching and credible way. After the protagonist, Julie, falls into a deep depression following her husband's and daughter's deaths in a car accident, she cuts herself off from all memories of her former life. After the accident, Julie puts her home on the market, sells all her possessions, divests herself of all money accumulated during the marriage, and even gives away numerous small mementoes. However, a talent she possesses secretly, the ability to make an average musical score great, and an old love, Olivier, help her to work through her depression and build a new life for herself.

The cinematography of BLUE appears to lift off the screen and surround the viewer with shades of blue that are meant to evoke the depression that the main character feels. It is through Julie's fulfilling relationship with Olivier, and not in music itself, that Julie finds the happiness that pulls her out of her depression. St. Paul's statement that the gift of prophecy is not enough, that we must also love, is invoked here as the film ends on this very upbeat note. Regrettably, the film is marred by female nudity, fornication and implied adultery which add nothing to the storyline.

In Brief: