COBB Add To My Top 10

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 02, 1994

Starring: Tommy Lee Jones, Robert Wuhl, Lolita Davidovich, Lou Meyers, & J. Kenneth Campell

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 128 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros.

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Ron Shelton

Address Comments To:

Content:

(AB, LLL, VVV, SS, NNN, A) Anti-biblical, fatalistic worldview; 100 obscenities, 55 profanities, & relentlessly abusive language including sexually crude remarks about women, bigoted comments about minorities & anti-Christian diatribes; extreme abuse & near rape, man shotgunned to death (repeated in three flashbacks), man pistol-whipped to death, fist fights, several characters threatened with shooting, wife-beating, repeated views of spiking (sliding into base with spikes high intending to injure another player), & fights during baseball games; repeated sexual immorality & adultery; brief but full female nudity; and, alcohol abuse & drunkenness throughout.

Summary:

COBB is a grating chronicle of the final months in the life of Ty Cobb, still widely regarded to have been the best baseball player of all time. He also was undoubtedly the most obnoxious ballplayer as well. Here we are treated to two solid hours of his nonstop obscenity, bigotry, alcoholism, immorality, and abusive behavior. Despite a riveting performance by Tommy Lee Jones in the title role, this film is relentlessly unpleasant, unedifying and unworthy of the price of a ticket.

Review:

COBB is a grating chronicle of the final months in the life of Ty Cobb, widely regarded as the best baseball player of all time. His lifetime batting average and several other records have remained unbeaten since his retirement in 1928 after 24 phenomenal seasons, and he was the first player elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. However, his behavior was relentlessly vile. Cobb routinely mauled defensive players at every base, aiming his sharpened spikes at the groin, abdomen or throat, and sending twelve competitors to the hospital in one season. He argued with umpires, duked it out with opposing teams and even assaulted fans. Armed guards were often needed to protect him from opposing fans. By the end of his life, when the film COBB begins its grating portrait, he had lots of money, but no one who could stand to be with him. At his funeral, no one, including family and teammates, cared that he was gone.

COBB treats the viewer to two solid hours of Ty Cobb's nonstop obscenity, bigotry, alcoholism, immorality, and abusive behavior. Regrettably, writer\director Ron Shelton leaves unanswered the question of whether greatness in some endeavor is worthy of public adulation when a person's life is otherwise a malignant wreck. Despite a riveting performance by Tommy Lee Jones, this film is relentlessly unpleasant, unedifying and unworthy of the price of a ticket.

In Brief: