JUMPER

Sci Fi Anti-Hero

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 15, 2008

Starring: Hayden Christiansen, Samuel L.
Jackson, Rachel Bilson, Jamie
Bell, Diane Lane, AnnaSophia
Robb, and Max Thierot

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Director: Doug Liman

Executive Producer: Stacy Maes, Kim Winther, Vince
Geradis, and Ralph M.
Viciananza

Producer: Arnon Milchan, Liucas Foster,
Jay Sanders, and Simon Kinberg

Writer: David S. Goyer, Jim Uhls and
Simon Kinberg

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO of News Corp.
Peter Chernin, President/COO of The Fox Group
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen/CEO
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(HH, PaPa, B, AbAb, LL, VV, S, N, AA, MM) Strong humanist pagan worldview with immoral pagan attitudes dominates, with some light moral elements where protagonist takes a moral stand against a young man helping him, but with strong implied anti-Christian elements where the main villain is a religious man who believes the protagonist is encroaching on the powers of an omnipresent God and wants to kill all such people like him; 16 obscenities (including one “f” word), three strong profanities and two light profanities, plus implied urinating; strong action violence includes fighting, villain ties people up, villain shocks people with electric shocks, villain tries to incapacitate people, buildings and objects crunched, vehicles crash, vehicles are teleported to hit people, teenager almost drowns, stacks of books suffer water damage, and villain stabs someone to death; two implied fornication scenes; upper male nudity and female cleavage; light alcohol use and adult bully appears drunk; no smoking; and, people get away with stealing, father and son have a somewhat bad relationship, bullying, and mother tells son she’ll give him a head start before she alerts her people who want to kill him.

Summary:

In JUMPER, a science fiction thriller, a religious fanatic wants to kill a young bank robber with the ability to teleport himself anywhere. JUMPER has obvious moral problems and implies that the religious fanatic is a Christian with a traditional view of God.

Review:

JUMPER, a science fiction movie with an interesting concept and plenty of action, ultimately misses some good opportunities. The biggest opportunity it misses comes when the movie reveals that the villains are another group of religious fanatics out to kill the good guys, who aren’t really all that good to begin with anyway

Loosely based on a book by Steven Gould, the story opens in high school, where young David Rice and his sweetheart, Millie, are being bullied by another boy. The bully throws a gift from David onto the ice in a pond. David tries to retrieve the gift, but falls under the ice. Panicked, David suddenly is able to teleport himself, and some water and ice, into the nearby public library.

Estranged from his father, whose wife left the family when David was five, David decides to take his newfound teleporting ability to leave home forever. He then decides to rob a bank in New York City. David succeeds, but a suspicious government agent named Roland (played by Samuel L. Jackson with dyed white hair) seems to know how David stole the money.

Several years later, David is a young adult, now played by Hayden Christensen. Flush with other stolen bank money, David is living the good life. Using his teleport abilities, he travels the world. Unhappily for him, however, a fiery “Jumper” named Griffin (played by Jamie Bell) has noticed David. Even worse, Roland turns out to be the leader of a group of evil implied Christians, called Paladins, who believe that teleporting Jumpers like David and Griffin shouldn’t have such God-like powers. Roland is on a mission to kill every Jumper he can capture, using new technology.

JUMPER is a fascinating science fiction story in the beginning, until it resorts to the old cliché of the evil Christians trying to hunt and kill people they view as an abomination to God. Although Roland’s Christianity is only implied, his belief and commitment to the traditional view of an omnipresent God are overt. Another problem with the movie is that its titular hero, David, gets away with breaking rules and robbing banks. This seriously dilutes the heroic qualities that the writers and filmmakers are trying to attach to this movie. The average moviegoer wants, and needs, heroes with redeeming qualities, not “heroes” who use their abilities to lie, cheat and steal.

In Brief:

JUMPER, a science fiction thriller, opens in a high school, where young David Rice and his sweetheart, Millie, are being bullied by another boy. David almost drowns when he goes to retrieve a gift thrown onto some pond ice. Panicked, David suddenly teleports himself, and some water and ice, into the nearby public library. Estranged from his father, whose wife left when David was five, David uses his newfound teleporting ability to leave home forever. Using his abilities, he starts robbing banks. Years later, David is a young adult flush with stolen money. Another teleporting “Jumper” has noticed David, however. So has Roland, the leader of a group of evil religious believers who want to kill all Jumpers because they are an abomination to God.

JUMPER has an interesting concept until it resorts to the cliché of evil Christians trying to hunt and kill people they view as an abomination to God. Also, the supposed hero gets away with stealing. This seriously dilutes the heroic qualities the filmmakers are trying to attach to him. The average moviegoer wants, and needs, heroes with redeeming qualities, not “heroes” who lie, cheat and steal.