NAKED IN NEW YORK

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 13, 1994

Starring: Eric Stoltz, Mary-Louise
Parker, Ralph Macchio, Tony
Curtis, Jill Clayburgh,
Kathleen Turner, & Timothy
Dalton

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 91 minutes

Distributor: Fine Line Features

Director: Dan Algrant

Executive Producer:

Producer: Frederick Zollo

Writer: Dan Algrant & John Warren

Address Comments To:

Content:

(R, LLL, NN, SSS, Ho) Romantic worldview; 22 obscenities & 11 profanities; male and female nudity; two explicit depictions of fornication with other sexual immorality implied; and, brief kiss between two men.

Summary:

NAKED IN NEW YORK is reminiscent of the Woody Allen school of urban anxiety as it focuses on a struggling author's attempt to see his play produced Off-Broadway. After a couple of explicit sexual encounters and some harsh language, we are left only with a lame affirmation that "things will probably turn out OK"--rather feeble optimism indeed in this so-so movie.

Review:

In NAKED IN NEW YORK, Eric Stoltz portrays Jake Briggs, an aspiring young playwright laboring to get his play produced Off-Broadway. With the aid of narration and flashbacks, the movie is the story of both Jake's past and current relationships, consisting of an eccentric single mother (Jill Clayburgh), an on-again, off-again lover (Mary-Louise Parker), her smooth-talking employer (Timothy Dalton), a male friend who harbors some homosexual feelings for him, the producer who finally brings the play to Off-Broadway (Tony Curtis), and the soap opera queen hired to give the play "star power" (Kathleen Turner). The nature of contemporary relationships is explored while Jake struggles with an overhaul of his play and a diva who seduces him and abandons the project when something better comes along.

NAKED IN NEW YORK is reminiscent of the Woody Allen school of urban anxiety. However, Like Jake's play, this film has its moments, but the entire package doesn't amount to much. After all is said and done (including, unfortunately, a couple of explicit sexual encounters and a fair amount of harsh language), we are left only with a lame affirmation that "things will probably turn out OK." This is feeble optimism indeed, built on rapidly shifting sand rather than a bedrock of assurance that our lives have an Author and Designer.

In Brief: