OLD DOGS

Uneven Family Comedy

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 25, 2009

Starring: John Travolta, Robin Williams,
Kelly Preston, Conner Rayburn,
Ella Bleu Travolta, Lori
Loughlin, Seth Green, Bernie
Mac, Matt Dillon, Ann
Margaret, and Rita Wilson

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older children and adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 88 minutes

Distributor: Walt Disney Pictures

Director: Walt Becker

Executive Producer: Garrett Grant

Producer: Peter Abrams, Robert L. Levy,
and Andrew Panay

Writer: David Diamond and David
Weissman

Address Comments To:

Robert Iger, President/CEO
The Walt Disney Company
Walt Disney Pictures
Rich Ross, Chairman
Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(BB, C, L, V, N, M) Strong moral worldview as character puts family above business, with light Christian reference where a secondary character wears cross; no obscenities and one profanity, plus some bathroom humor and a dog urinates; slapstick violence of two men hit in groin with golf balls, penguins pecking on man, men fall down; no sexual content; no nudity but man appears in underwear; no alcohol; no smoking; and, accidental taking of someone else’s prescription medication.

Summary:

OLD DOGS stars Robin Williams and John Travolta in a funny but uneven story about a middle-aged man who suddenly discovers he had fathered a set of 7-year-old twins. The movie has a strong moral worldview extolling family and personal relationships, but it contains some light bathroom humor and slapstick comedy.

Review:

OLD DOGS stars Robin Williams as Dan, an aging divorcee who suddenly discovers that he had fathered a set of 7-year-old twins. His best friend and business partner, Charlie (played by John Travolta), is a confirmed bachelor. Together, they must take care of the twins for two weeks while their mother – the woman Dan married for 24 hours while drunk – has to go to jail for two weeks on a trespassing charge.

Dan is glad to discover that he is actually a father. His son Zach has a “dad list” of things he always wanted a dad to do with him. Dan is awkward around children, however, and struggles to be the perfect dad for two weeks, especially when he learns his daughter Emily had fantasized that he was actually a superhero.

Meanwhile, Dan and Charlie are about to conclude a business deal that will set them up as millionaires for life. As the deadline for the business proposal looms, Dan with twins in tow must move in with Charlie temporarily since his condo is for adults only.

Dan struggles with choices about fatherhood vs. business. When the only way to make the deal turns into a move to Japan, Dan is faced with a choice between success and family.

OLD DOGS is an uneven comedy. There are some funny moments, such as everyone thinking Dan and Charlie are grandfathers. There is some very funny slapstick when Dan is “controlled” by Charlie using technology to help Dan to learn to play with kids. Also, when Dan and Charlie’s prescription medicine is mixed up, they have comical side effects

Some of the jokes fall flat, however, and the story moves over very familiar territory. It also doesn’t ring true when Dan chooses family over business, but there are no consequences to his choice. Though the movie has a short running time, it still drags in some parts. Williams and Travolta rise above the characters as written in the script.

OLD DOGS has a strong moral worldview extolling family and personal relationships. There is only one profanity, and the violence is slapstick in nature. There is some bathroom humor, however. Overall, this PG-rated movie carries a positive message but warrants a light caution.

In Brief:

OLD DOGS stars Robin Williams as Dan, who suddenly discovers that he has fathered a set of 7-year-old twins. With help from his best friend and business partner, Charlie, played by John Travolta, he must take care of the twins for two weeks. While Dan is glad to be a father, he is awkward around children and struggles to be the perfect dad for two weeks. Meanwhile, Dan and Charlie are about to conclude a business deal that will set them up as millionaires. Dan struggles with choices about fatherhood vs. business. In the end, he must face a choice about what’s the most important thing in his life.

OLD DOGS is an uneven comedy. There are some funny moments and some humorous slapstick. Though the movie has a short running time, it still drags sometimes. Williams and Travolta rise above the characters in the script. OLD DOGS has a strong moral worldview extolling family and personal relationships. There is only one profanity, and the violence is slapstick in nature. There is also some bathroom humor. Overall, this PG-rated movie carries a positive message but warrants a light caution.