WELCOME HOME ROSCOE JENKINS Add To My Top 10

Clouded by Foul Language and Crude Humor

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 08, 2008

Starring: Martin Lawrence, Louis C.K., Nicole Ari Parker, James Earl Jones, and Joy Bryant

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 114 minutes

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey R. Immelt, Chairman/CEO, General Electric
Jeff Zucker, President/CEO
NBC Universal Entertainment
Ron Meyer, President/COO, Universal Studios
Marc Shmuger, Chairman
David Linde, Co-Chairman
Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(PaPa, BB, C, Ab, LLL, V, SS, NN, A, DD, MM) Strong mixed pagan worldview with some strong pagan elements, including lots of crude humor, a strong moral premise where the protagonist learns the importance of putting others first, respecting parents, becoming a good father, and loving his family more than himself, with some mixed Christian and anti-Christian content such as a prayer before a meal, an off-color joke about “speaking in tongues” and references to using church (including improper clothing and carrying condoms) for getting dates that lead to sex; about 117 obscenities (including one “f” word and some bleeped out “f” word), a couple strong profanities and 18 profanities; comic fighting between adult siblings, including punching, wrestling, kicking, and mostly destroying the inside of parent’s house; depicted promiscuity and sexual perversion, including overly graphic “mating” of two dogs, and references to male and female private parts, comments about women’s breasts and pornography; upper male nudity, partial frontal female nudity and reference to shaving privates, and woman in skimpy clothing and revealing exercise outfits; alcohol use; multiple drug references but no depictions; and, examples of bad parenting with father being absent from son’s life and uncaring, bad role model by father to son, lying, betting, getting revenge, mocking use of a Middle-Eastern accent, and multiple use of the “n” word between black characters.

Summary:

WELCOME HOME ROSCOE JENKINS is the story of a fictional talk-show host and self-help guru, who left behind his humble Southern background and family name, but whose life is shaken up when he returns home for his parents’ 50th wedding anniversary. The actors all give noteworthy performances, but even with a strong and positive final message, the movie is dampened and overshadowed by all the unnecessary foul language and incredibly crude humor.

Review:

WELCOME HOME ROSCOE JENKINS is the story of a fictional talk-show host, RJ Stevens (Martin Lawrence). RJ left behind his humble Southern background and family name (RJ stands for Roscoe Jenkins, his real name) to transform into a self-help guru dispensing his "Team of Me" philosophy to millions of adoring fans. With a Reality TV star from SURVIVOR as his fiancée and plenty of wealth, he’s truly living the Hollywood dream.

When his parent’s plead for him to come to their 50th wedding anniversary after years of being away, Jenkins packs up his 10-year-old son and bride-to-be and heads back home to Georgia. It's a chance to prove to his family that he's no longer the awkward boy they used to relentlessly ridicule. At least, that's the plan. But, when his crazy, lovable family calls him on his big-city attitude and challenges him at every turn, RJ is forced to take a hard look at the man he's become.

Roscoe’s family has a tight bond but that is quickly disrupted when their “superstar” prodigal son rolls back into town. Adding to the confusion is Roscoe’s old friend, Reggie (Mike Epps), who is a wildly promiscuous swindler, drug user and thief. The real source of all the rising trouble, other than Roscoe’s deepest desire to flaunt his fame and success, is the rebirth of an old rivalry between him and his “adopted” brother, Clyde (Cedric The Entertainer). All of this confusion is sharply contrasted by the positive lives of Roscoe’s brother, Otis (Michael Clarke Duncan), who is also the town’s reputable sheriff, and his parents, Papa Jenkins (James Earl Jones) and Mama Jenkins (Margaret Avery). The way they have their lives together and the positive family model of Otis, with a pregnant wife and 2 teenage children, puts Roscoe’s idea of “success” to shame. It takes RJ most of the film, however, to figure this out. In the meantime, he is distracted by his misguided relationship with his neurotic fiancée, who is consumed by winning, being popular, and controlling everything Roscoe does. To mix things up even more, an old flame of Roscoe’s, Lucinda (Nicole Ari Parker), comes back into the picture. She causes inner turmoil for Roscoe and brings out the worst in his fiancée at the same time.

The acting of this movie is rather impressive, with a talented and well rounded cast. The writing leaves a lot to be desired. A very positive message eventually wins the day, but not before the audience is forced to endure an insane amount of foul language, perverted jokes, sexual references, silly violence, and blatantly offensive religious remarks and suggestions against characters claiming to be “Christian.” The worst examples are when Roscoe begins stuttering during the only sexual scene of the movie, and his fiancée proudly proclaims that she’s “so good” she is making him “speak in tongues.” The other incredibly offensive character is Roscoe’s cousin who curses over and over, then pretends to “praise the Lord,” and constantly speaks of going to church and singing in the choir in order to meet guys with whom she can have sexual relations. So, as strong as the final message ends up being, it is dampened and overshadowed by all the unnecessary foul language and incredibly crude humor.

In Brief:

WELCOME HOME ROSCOE JENKINS stars Martin Lawrence as RJ Stevens, a TV talk show host and self-help guru who left his humble Southern background and family name. RJ, which stands for Roscoe Jenkins, his real name, dispenses his "Team of Me" philosophy to millions of adoring fans. With a Reality TV star as his fiancée and plenty of wealth, he’s living the Hollywood dream. Roscoe’s parents plead for him to come to their 50th wedding anniversary after years of separation. He packs up his 10-year-old son and bride-to-be and heads back home to Georgia. When his crazy, lovable family calls him on his big-city attitude and challenges him at every turn, Roscoe is forced to take a hard look at himself.

The acting of the talented cast is impressive, but the writing leaves a lot to be desired. A very positive message eventually wins the day, but not before the audience is forced to endure an insane amount of foul language, perverted jokes, sexual references, and silly violence. There are also blatantly offensive religious remarks about characters claiming to be “Christian” but displaying lifestyles and actions that are anything but.