Battle: Los Angeles Add To My Top 10

Semper Fi!

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 11, 2011

Starring: Aaron Eckhart, Michelle Rodriguez, Ramon Rodriguez, Bridget Moynahan, Ne-Yo, Michael Peña, Bryce Cass

Genre: Science Fiction/War Movie

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 112 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Lynton, Chairman/CEO
Amy Pascal, Chairman - Motion Picture Group
Sony Pictures Entertainment (Columbia Pictures/TriStar/Screen Gems/AFFIRM Films)
10202 West Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232-3195
Phone: (310) 244-4000; Fax: (310) 244-2626
Web Page: www.spe.sony.com/

Content:

(BBB, PPP, CC, LLL, VV, S, A, D) Very strong moral, patriotic worldview with strong Christian, redemptive elements, including a positive but brief reference to Jesus Christ and to the Bible and Bible study; about 71 obscenities (many “h” and “a” words with one “f” word), 19 strong profanities (mostly GD but some JC words) and four light profanities; strong, intense war violence with some blood includes big gunfights, explosions, soldiers hit and killed, children in danger, dead bodies shown on the street, aliens hit by armored vehicles, missile type weapons, soldiers sacrifice themselves to keep civilians safe, alien opened up to see what’s the best way to kill his kind, and rocket launchers and grenade launchers fired; light sexual content includes no sex scenes but soldiers meet three girls at night on a golf course and there is brief talk about one of the youngest soldiers being a “virgin”; no nudity; brief alcohol use; brief smoking; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES is a spectacular, passionate and compelling movie about U.S. Marines fighting off an alien invasion in Los Angeles. BATTLE: LOS ANGELES is totally riveting and brilliantly directed, with a terrific performance by Aaron Eckhart, but there’s plenty of PG-13 foul language and lots of intense battle violence, so extreme caution is advised.

Review:

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES is a spectacular, passionate and poignant science fiction movie about U.S. Marines fighting off an alien invasion of Southern California. It’s a stirring, patriotic salute to the brave men and women of the United States Marine Corps. There is abundant PG-13 foul language and lots of intense battle violence, however, so extreme caution is advised.

The story focuses on Staff Sergeant Michael Nantz, played by Aaron Eckhart in his best role so far. After losing his platoon during a firefight in Iraq, Nantz decides to retire.

Then, an alien invasion hits major cities around the world, including Los Angeles. Nantz is immediately put back into active duty under a green second lieutenant named Martinez. Martinez and the other platoon members are wary of Nantz, however, especially Cpl. Jason Lockett, who lost his brother under Nantz’s command.

The platoon is sent to a police station in Santa Monica, to retrieve some stranded civilians before the Air Force starts bombing the whole area. They find some civilians, including three children, but the area is infested with alien soldiers.

The platoon and the civilians desperately try to make it back to the evacuation zone. Trying to get back, and fend off the aliens, will be harder than anyone imagined. Complications ensue when the platoon discovers there won’t be any air strike – the aliens have wiped out the local forward base.

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES is more of a war movie than a science fiction thriller. That said, there is plenty of sci fi thrills and special effects to keep fans happy. Best of all, BATTLE: LOS ANGELES is a totally compelling, brilliantly directed movie that’s absolutely riveting. Even better, it’s a very positive salute to the U.S. Marine Corps. In fact, we probably haven’t seen this good and inspiring a patriotic war movie in years.

Overall, BATTLE: LOS ANGELES has a strong moral worldview. Aaron Eckhart gives a terrific performance as the tough, intelligent, dutiful, and compassionate staff sergeant with a past. Mature viewers of both sexes probably will find him and the other characters compelling and courageous as well as real and believable.

The biggest cautionary note is the movie’s foul language. Although it avoids the harsh language of an R-rated action movie, BATTLE: LOS ANGELES has numerous expletives. It’s really a shame that today’s jaded viewers probably think a movie like this must have lots of obscenities and profanities in order to be believable or realistic. There are no other really strong lewd moments, however. So, the rest of the movie deserves a hearty, Bravo!

In Brief:

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES is a spectacular, passionate, surprisingly poignant movie about U.S. Marines fighting off an alien invasion. The story focuses on Staff Sergeant Michael Nantz, played superbly by Aaron Eckhart. After losing his platoon during a firefight in Iraq, Nantz decides to retire. Then, an alien invasion hits major cities around the world, including Los Angeles. Nantz is immediately put back into active duty under a green second lieutenant named Martinez. Martinez and the other platoon members are wary of Nantz, especially Cpl. Jason Lockett, who lost his brother under Nantz’s command. The platoon is sent to a police station in Santa Monica, to retrieve some stranded civilians before the Air Force starts bombing the whole area. They find some civilians, but the area is infested with alien soldiers.

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES is a totally compelling, brilliantly directed movie that’s absolutely riveting. Even better, it’s a very positive salute to the U.S. Marine Corps. In fact, we haven’t seen this good, inspiring and patriotic war movie in years. BATTLE: LOS ANGELES has plenty of PG-13 foul language and lots of intense battle violence, however, so extreme caution is advised.