BEBE'S KIDS

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 31, 1992

Starring: VOICES: Faizon Love, Nell
Carter, Myra J., Vanessa Bell
Calloway, Tone Loc, Wayne
Collins, Jonell Green, &
Marques Houston.

Genre: Animation

Audience: All ages RECOMMENDED AUDIENCE:
Age 15 & up

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director: Bruce Smith

Executive Producer:

Producer: Reginald Hudlin

Writer: Reginald Hudlin & Warrington
Hudlin

Address Comments To:

Content:

(L, VV, S, A/D, M) 9 obscenities & 3 exclamatory profanities; slapstick violence (poking man in rear with knife, forcing children to walk the plank, man's hair on fire, man's lips jammed in electric window, child falls from bookcase, slingshot hits girl's rear end, fist fights) & destruction of property; boy fondles himself, distorted body parts, brassiere, & French kissing; chain-smoking, intoxication & bar scenes; rebellion, disrespect for elders, rudeness, single mother neglects children, vomiting, & stealing.


Summary:

A trip to the amusement park becomes a living nightmare in BEBE'S KIDS, when two adults fail to discipline their bratty youngsters. Although BEBE'S KIDS is presented as a witty African-American cartoon, it is more disturbing than entertaining. There is nothing funny about children who wreck havoc, speak disrespectfully, and aren't disciplined.


Review:

BEBE'S KIDS begins when Robin asks Jamika, a divorcee with a 7-year-old son named Leon, out. She accepts provided Leon and her girlfriend BEBE'S KIDS come along. Heading out to FUNWORLD, the local amusement park, BEBE'S KIDS, LaShawn, Kahlil and PeeWee, are out-of-control. LaShawn is a "smack me, and I'll smack you back," pony-tailed sister. Kahlil sets off an alarm, causing everyone to panic. PeeWee is a dirty-diapered toddler, weaned on cigarettes and MAD magazine. When Kahlil unplugs a ride, a robot-skeleton brings the foursome before a jury. Abe Lincoln presides over the trial as Nixon shows a videotape of the calamity BEBE'S KIDS caused at FUNWORLD. With music and dance, the children plead their case, insisting that "every great leader broke the rules" and that what they really need is freedom.
Although BEBE'S KIDS is presented as a witty African-American cartoon, it is more disturbing than entertaining. There is nothing funny about children who wreck havoc, speak disrespectfully and aren't disciplined. Ironically, the movie suggests that quality time and paying more attention to children helps resolve such behavior problems without proper attention to their need for discipline. Other distorted values surface with racist and stereotypical remarks.


In Brief: