CITY OF JOY

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 17, 1992

Starring: Patrick Swayze, Pauline
Collins, Om Puri, Shabana
Azmi, & Art Malik

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: Tri-Star

Director: Roland Jaffe

Executive Producer:

Producer: Mark Medoff ON THE NOVEL BY:
Dominique Lapierre

Writer: Jake Eberts & Roland Jaffe

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, LLL, VV, C, H, NA) A watered down Christian call to sacrifice one's self and help the sick and the poor which is fatally marred by approximately 35 profanities and 30 obscenities, thuggery and violence (a woman's face is slashed with a razor), and an eclectic concept of religion featuring some Hindu worship (but nothing obtrusive or offensive).


Summary:

In CITY OF JOY disillusioned physician Max travels to Calcutta where he meets Catholic Sister Joan and winds up getting involved as a medical doctor with a hospital for India's poor and leprous. The movie lacks a convincing plot and credible acting. Moreover, it has a slow pace and confuses a watered down view of Christianity with syncretism and a mild dose of Marxist humanism.


Review:

In THE CITY OF JOY, physician Max travels to Calcutta where he meets Irish Catholic Sister Joan. When Max arrives, he is full of self pity and anger, but as he becomes acquainted with Sister Joan, who works with the outcasts and lepers of India, he begins considering others. One night, Max is called to come help a woman in childbirth, and he delivers a little boy. The locals pay protection to the "slum lord." Max urges them to stand up to the cruel regime and to establish another headquarters for the hospital. In turn, the tyrant gets his henchmen to destroy the hospital and to slash one girl's beautiful face with a razor. After the fight, the people rebuild, and Max decides to stay as the resident physician for the hospital called The City of Joy.
THE CITY OF JOY contains much unnecessary profanity purporting as it does to be a religious film about the importance of helping unfortunate people. Unfortunately, the movie lacks other things besides clean language: the pace lags with huge gaps where nothing seems to be happening, Swayze's acting is mediocre, and the story unconvincing. Furthermore, the portrait of Christianity is watered down and confused with a mild dose of Marxist classism.


In Brief: