DON'T MOVE

The Rape of Italy

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 11, 2005

Starring: Penelope Cruz, Sergio
Castellito and Claudia Gerini

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 125 minutes

Distributor: Northern Arts Entertainment

Director: Sergio Castellito

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Riccardo Tozzi, Givanni
Stabilini and Marco Chimenz

Writer: Sergio Castellito and Margaret
Mazzantini

Address Comments To:

John Lawrence Ré, CEO
Northern Arts Entertainment
Seven Strong Avenue
Northhampton, MA 01060
Phone: (413) 585-8100
Fax: (413) 585-8102
Website: www.northernartsentertainment.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, B, C, Ab, LL, VV, SSS, NN, AA, D, MMM) Very strong pagan worldview about a long-time adulterous affair, with some moral elements and references to Christianity and Jesus Christ, and doctor denies existence of God, but his mistress says let’s hope God doesn’t exist because, otherwise, they’re in big trouble; 12 mostly strong obscenities, one light profanity, and woman sits on toilet, then uses toilet paper; sudden disturbing violence includes rape scene, teenager’s brain swabbed for brain surgery, aftermath of traffic accident, and doctor cuts open woman’s stomach to release blood from botched abortion; scenes of depicted adultery and depicted rape in one scene; brief upper female nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking; and, man lies to wife when he goes to visit mistress, mistress informs lover she’s gotten an abortion and negative portrayal of protagonist’s marriage.

Summary:

DON’T MOVE is an award-winning Italian drama about a married doctor’s long-time affair with a woman from the opposite sides of the track. The movie’s explicit sex, adultery and foul language is abhorrent to media-wise audiences.

Review:

DON’T MOVE is an award-winning Italian drama for adults about a married doctor’s long-time affair with a woman from the opposite sides of the track. The movie opens with the doctor, Timoteo’s, 15-year-old daughter needing a brain operation after her bicycle is hit. As Timoteo waits nervously outside the operating room, he recalls the illicit love affair that began 16 years ago when his car broke down.

A hotel maid named Italia invites Timoteo to use her phone to call his wife, but, when his wife’s not there, Timoteo rapes the poor woman and leaves. Later, Timoteo returns to Italia, apologizes, and they begin a torrid affair. The needy Italia responds warmly to the warped affection from Timoteo, who falls in love with Italia.

When Italia becomes pregnant, Timoteo decides to leave his beautiful wife, Elsa, only to find that Elsa herself has become pregnant. Timoteo is afraid to explain this situation to Italia. After a month or so, Italia gets tired of waiting. She suddenly informs Timoteo that she’s gotten an abortion. She angrily tells him to go away, but Timoteo can’t stay away from her. Meanwhile, his wife suffers in silence, but it is clear that they are no longer on speaking terms.

Timoteo returns to Italia. They drive to her hometown for a few days, only to find that the abortion was botched. Desperately, Timoteo has to operate in order to try and save Italia’s life.

DON’T MOVE is offensive on several levels. An adulterous love affair begins with a rape. Then, as the illicit lovers cement their bond, the movie tries to generate sympathy for them, especially because circumstances seem to keep getting in the way of their desire for happiness together. Eventually, as he waits to hear whether his daughter survived, Timoteo finds emotional strength and redemption from guilt through his memories of his passionate, fragile mistress. This ending includes dialogue where Timoteo informs a nurse that, when he prayed fervently to God during one emergency, his prayers were not answered, but when he didn’t pray to God during another emergency, his wishes were granted. Timoteo seems at a loss to explain this mystery of Providence or Fate.

Explicit scenes of immoral sexuality and crude language engulf this movie’s stylistic flourishes and passionate acting by Penelope Cruz and Sergio Castellito, who directs the movie from his wife, Margaret’s, best-selling novel. The offensive content in DON’T MOVE will, of course, scream, “Don’t see it!” to most discerning viewers.

In Brief:

DON’T MOVE is an award-winning Italian drama for adults about a married doctor’s long-time affair with a woman from the opposite sides of the track. The movie opens with the doctor, Timoteo’s, 15-year-old daughter needing a brain operation after her bicycle is hit. As Timoteo waits nervously outside the operating room, he recalls the illicit love affair that began 16 years ago when his car broke down. After raping Italia, a hotel maid who lets Timoteo use her phone, he begins a torrid affair with her, an affair which leads to tragedy and a loveless marriage.

DON’T MOVE is offensive on several levels. Explicit scenes of immoral sexuality and crude language engulf the movie’s stylistic flourishes and passionate acting. An adulterous love affair begins with a rape. Then, as the illicit lovers cement their bond, the movie tries to generate sympathy for them, especially because circumstances seem to keep getting in the way of their desire for happiness together. Eventually, Timoteo finds emotional strength and redemption from guilt through his memories of his passionate, fragile mistress, Italia. The offensive content in DON’T MOVE will, of course, scream, “Don’t see it!” to most discerning viewers.