FUNNY PEOPLE

Raunchy Comedy with Heart

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 31, 2009

Starring: Adam Sandler, Seth Rogen,
Leslie Mann, Eric Bana, Jonah
Hill, Jason Schwartzman,
Aubrey Plaza, Allan Wasserman,
and as themselves James
Taylor, Rod Man, Andy Dick,
Charles Fleischer, Budd
Friedman, Carol Leifer, Paul
Reiser, Norm MacDonald, Ray
Romano, and Eminem

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 146 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures/General
Electric

Director: Judd Apatow

Executive Producer: Jack Giarraputo, Evan Goldberg
and Seth Rogen

Producer: Judd Apatow, Barry Mendel and
Clayton Townsend

Writer: Judd Apatow

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey R. Immelt, Chairman/CEO
General Electric
Jeff Zucker, President/CEO
NBC Universal
Ron Meyer, President/COO
Universal Studios
Marc Shmuger, Chairman
David Linde, Co-Chairman
Universal Pictures
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(PaPa, B, LLL, V, SSS, NN, A, DD, M) Strong pagan worldview with a moral center of doing what’s right even if it costs you your job; 149 strong obscenities, mostly the “f” word, 12 profanities, at least 30 references to male genitalia, and other crude bathroom humor; three men in a fist fight, minor blood; very strong sexual content includes three scenes of depicted sex, two with unmarried couple, one adulterous, plus continual references and dialogue concerning sex; upper male nudity, upper female nudity, and girls in bikinis; drinking of wine and beer; smoking of cigarettes and one scene of smoking marijuana; and, lying and adultery.

Summary:

FUNNY PEOPLE is the story of George Simmons, a famous comedian who learns that he has a terminal condition, which causes him to rethink his life’s choices. Though the movie has more heart than comedy, it is marred by depicted sex, nudity and nearly constant obscene language.

Review:

FUNNY PEOPLE is the story of George Simmons, a famous comedian (played by Adam Sandler) who learns that he has a terminal, inoperable condition. This prompts George to rethink his life’s choices. He takes in Ira, a new comedian played by Seth Rogen, in an attempt to have a genuine friend and to learn about relationships.

George starts experimental medical treatment and begins to go back to doing stand up, letting Ira open for him. George reconnects with Laura, his former fiancée who is now married and with a family.

George realizes that money, fame, and constant sex has come at the expense of no true relationships. He lost his fiancée because he was unfaithful to her. George talks Laura into leaving her husband, though they each know that George is not mature enough to really stay in a relationship. Ira risks and then loses his job with George when he attempts to stop George from breaking up Laura’s family.

FUNNY PEOPLE is a movie that, while funny at times, has much heart and deals with the topic of death and relationships. The movie’s point is that friendship is vital. George is a very immature person who grows in the movie, though he isn’t completely mature in the end.

Adam Sandler and Seth Rogen both give great performances as comedians sorting out life and relationships. Rogen’s character is especially humble and genuine.

FUNNY PEOPLE has a very long running time, however, especially for a comedy. Consequently, there is a sense of it going on too long. A secondary plot of Ira’s roommates who are on a very bad web sitcom and their relationships often seems counter to the main story of George and Ira.

Though FUNNY PEOPLE attempts to weave a dramatic story within the comedy, any attempt at heart is often overshadowed by the sheer volume of obscene material. The movie is filled with discussion of sex, male private parts, and obscene language, mostly the “f” word. The humor of the two comedians when they are onstage and off stage is vile and obscene and serves to only distance their story from the viewer. There are also multiple scenes of depicted sex, though often played somewhat for laughs.

Though the story is about facing mortality, there is very little discussion of God (except for profanities). Jokingly, a friend discusses Hell, depicting it as a place where you “play checkers with Hitler.”

The amount of obscene content in FUNNY PEOPLE is clearly excessive and unacceptable. People who spew such filth are really not very funny people.

In Brief:

FUNNY PEOPLE is the story of George Simmons, a famous comedian who learns that he has a terminal condition which causes him to rethink his life’s choices. He takes in Ira, a new comedian, to have a genuine friend. George realizes that money, fame, and constant sex has come at the expense of true relationships. He lost his fiancée because he was unfaithful. George tries to break up his ex-fiancé’s marriage. Ira risks and then loses his job with George when he attempts to stop George from breaking up Laura’s family.

FUNNY PEOPLE attempts to weave a dramatic story within the comedy, but any attempt at heart is overshadowed by the movie’s sheer volume of obscene material. The movie is filled with discussion of sex, male private parts, and obscene language, mostly the “f” word along with depicted sexual scenes. The humor of the two comedians when they are onstage and off stage is vile and obscene and serves to only distance their story from the viewer. Though dealing with death, there is no mention of God. The amount of obscene content in FUNNY PEOPLE is clearly excessive and unacceptable.