IMPOSTER

Serious Potboiler

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 04, 2002

Starring: Gary Sinise, Madeleine Stowe,
Vincent D’Onofrio, Mekhi
Phifer, & Tony Shalhoub

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 96 minutes

Distributor: Dimension Films

Director: Gary Fleder

Executive Producer: Michael Phillips, Bob
Weinstein & Harvey Weinstein

Producer: Gary Fleder & Gary Sinise

Writer: Caroline Case, Ehren Kruger &
David Twohy

Address Comments To:

Bob Weinstein & Harvey Weinstein
Dimension Films
99 Hudson Street, 5th Floor
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (212) 219-4100
Fax: (212) 941-3836
www.dimensionfilms.com

Content:

(C, B, Ro, LL, VVV, S, N, M) Mildly redemptive worldview with some moral & Romantic elements, including questions concerning the existence of God & a warning about having a global government; about 8 obscenities, 4 strong profanities & 5 mild profanities; sometimes strong, intense science fiction violence including shootouts, chase scenes, cyborg heart shown with mechanical bomb attached after machine off screen tears heart out of enemy robot, hero threatened with having his own heart torn out to look for cyborg bomb, woman removes implanted tracking device from man’s spine, explosions, & hand-to-hand combat; implied sex between apparently married couple with movie showing them embracing in bed; partial nudity, but nothing salacious; no alcohol use; no smoking; and, stealing medicine & betrayal.

Summary:

In IMPOSTER, a government scientist fights charges in 2079 that he is really an alien cyborg with a bomb inside his heart meant to blow up a government official or, worse, an entire city. The morality in this uneven movie is diluted by some depressing plot twists and some foul language.

Review:

IMPOSTER is a science-fiction potboiler that’s rather timely these days. It tells a story about alien invaders who have supposedly rigged a terrorist bomb to go off in a crowded city, perhaps killing high-level government officials. It also concerns itself with the issues of government surveillance, personal freedom and globalism. In these days of international coalition building and homeland security to fight terrorism, this movie could not be more topical.

Gary Sinise plays scientist Spencer Olham, who is making a huge bomb for the international government in the year 2079. The government was formed to fight aliens from Alpha Centauri who have invaded Earth’s solar system. John is happily married to his wife, Maya, a doctor, played by Madeleine Stowe.

Olham arrives at work to put the finishing touches on his super bomb. He and his wife are supposed to meet the female Chancellor of the international government later that evening. At work, however, Olham is arrested by a government agent, played by Vincent D’Onofrio, who accuses him of being an android, specifically a cyborg, with a bomb planted in him to kill the Chancellor. Olham denies this, but he escapes after asking the agent how he knows that the cyborg isn’t meant to kill the agent instead of the Chancellor.

Olham escapes outside the dome protecting the city from the alien warships. He uses the help of an anti-government activist, played by Mekhi Phifer, to go back into the city to find the proof that will show that he, Olham, is truly human.

Viewers will probably guess part of the resolution to this story. They may be disappointed by its final outcome, however, because IMPOSTER is a dark, dank and somewhat depressing movie that’s not as interested in providing enjoyment for viewers as much as it should be. Not all is lost in the movie’s final scenes, however, which contain some redemptive aspects, though not enough to fully satisfy.

Ultimately, viewers may walk away being impressed by the setting and special effects in IMPOSTER, but not with all of the action, which is often too dark and confusing to be really entertaining. If Hollywood continues to insist on setting action scenes during night, it must start doing a better job of lighting these scenes so that moviegoers can tell what exactly is going on in the story.

In Brief:

In IMPOSTER, Gary Sinise plays scientist Spencer Olham, who is making a huge bomb for the international government to fight alien invaders in the year 2079. Olham arrives at work to put the finishing touches on his super bomb. He and his wife are supposed to meet the female Chancellor of the international government later that evening. At work, however, Olham is arrested by a government agent, played by Vincent D’Onofrio, who accuses him of being an android, specifically a cyborg, with a bomb planted in him to kill the Chancellor. Olham denies this, but he escapes after asking the agent how he knows that the cyborg isn’t meant to kill him instead of the Chancellor. Olham uses the help of an anti-government activist, played by Mekhi Phifer, to go back into the city to find the proof that will show that he, Olham, is truly human.



IMPOSTER is a science-fiction potboiler that’s rather timely these days. It deals topically with important issues such as government surveillance, personal freedom, globalism, and terrorism. The morality in the redemptive movie is diluted, however, by some depressing plot twists and some strong foul language.