LIVE NUDE GIRLS

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 08, 1995

Starring: Dana Delany, Kim Cattral, Cynthia Stevenson, Laila Robins, Lora Zane, & Olivia d'Abo

Genre: Comedy

Audience:

Rating:

Runtime: 93

Distributor: I.R.S. Releasing

Director: Julianna Lavin

Executive Producer:

Producer: Cara Tapper, Steve White & Barry Bernardi

Writer: Julianna Lavin

Address Comments To:

Content:

(NA, HoHoHo, LLL, SSS, NNN, A, D, M) Pagan worldview where satisfying self and sexual drives take eminence, including is a strong lesbianism theme; 17 obscenities & 35 profanities, rampant sexual talk with vivid descriptions of sexual fantasies; 3 graphic sex scenes including one with two lesbians, masturbation, sadism, sexual liaisons, adultery, & young girls looking at Playboy; full female nudity & women in underwear; alcohol use; drug use & smoking; and, miscellaneous immorality including divorce.

Summary:

In LIVE NUDE GIRLS, a bachelorette/slumber party for girlhood friends turn into an evening of shared experiences and the unveiling of secret sexual fantasies. Profuse use of profanities, intensive and detailed sexual talk, graphic sex scenes, plenty of nudity and a badly-directed and scripted film make LIVE NUDE GIRLS unacceptable and unpleasant to watch.

Review:

In the film LIVE NUDE GIRLS, girlhood friends gather together for a bachelorette party in honor of their friend Jamie who is getting married. Georgina is the hostess who now has second thoughts about her live-in lesbian lover Chris. The rest of the group comprises suburban wife and mother Jill, smug with her marriage and desperately envied by her older sister Rachel. Rounding out the group is sensible accountant Marcy who astounds everyone with terrifying tales of a casual sexual encounter with her house painter who is now stalking her. As the evening progresses, intimate sexual fantasies are shared, and the women become closer.

This is not a well-made film. Its script is contrived, shallow and reflects tremendous disrespect for its subject and characters. The sexual talk, descriptions and scenes are sophomoric, vulgar and crude. Attempts, by director and writer, Julianna Lavin, to make this a savvy film about contemporary women result only in a story that has little intelligence, sensitivity and wit. The women romping around in their underwear or seen naked in steamy sexual fantasies are more reflective of giggling teenagers that the young accomplished women they are supposed to be. Profuse profanities round up what is really a dismal, disappointing and highly unacceptable film experience..

In Brief: