ROAD TO REDEMPTION Add To My Top 10

A Lively Comedy for Christ

Content +4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Pat Hingle, Julie Condra, Leo Ross, Jay Underwood, Tony Longo, & Wes Studi

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older children & adults

Rating: G

Runtime: 85 mintues

Address Comments To:

Barry Werner, President
World Wide Pictures, Inc.
1201 Hennepin Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55403-1783
Phone: (800) 998-3456 & (800) 745-4318
Fax: (612) 338-3029
Website: www.wwp.org

Content:

(CCC, BBB, V, M) Christian worldview in comedy about the redemption of a sinner, plus strong moral values overcome sinfulness; no foul language; mild slapstick violence including thug punches man off screen two times, car chase, several car accidents, man accidentally fires shotgun, train hits car, & people threatened with death unless they hand over stolen money; no sex but unmarried couple lives together; no nudity; and, mild miscellaneous immorality such as gambling, stealing, gangsterism, arson, & lying, but all of it is directly or indirectly rebuked by the Christian witness appearing in the story.

Summary:

ROAD TO REDEMPTION is a lively, funny Christian comedy from World Wide Pictures about a sinful, careless young woman who finds redemption in Christ. It is a fast-paced comedy with wholesome values and a Christian worldview that audiences should not miss.

Review:

ROAD TO REDEMPTION is a lively, funny Christian comedy from World Wide Pictures, the movie ministry of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.

Julie Condra stars as Amanda Tucker, a spoiled young woman in debt. Amanda gets in trouble with the mob after she and her boyfriend Alan Fischer (Jay Underwood) “borrow” $250,000 from her boss, a gangster (Leo Rossi). Amanda and Alan lose the money on a horse race after using some racing tips stolen from her office.

The only person who can help her now is her dear, old, filthy rich grandfather, Nathan, played by Broadway and TV talent Pat Hingle (Commissioner Gordon in the four BATMAN movies). Amanda hasn’t seen her grandfather since she was a little girl, but that doesn’t stop Amanda. She thinks Grandfather will be a pushover.

Nathan is no fool, however. He’s a witty, kind, compassionate man with a weak heart and a strong faith in Jesus Christ. He sees right through Amanda’s plans, but he’s got one of his own. Instead of refusing her, he makes a deal with her. He will give her the money, but only after she takes a little trip with him to his favorite fishing hole in Redemption, Montana, the same place where she sat on Grandpa’s knee many years before. Her boss and his henchman, Vincent, however, have dragged her boyfriend into the search for her. Now, they’re hot on her trail.

ROAD TO REDEMPTION is a fast-paced comedy with wholesome values. Unlike some family movies with earnest moral values, it mostly avoids the corny and cliché material that might turn off older, contemporary viewers. It still retains the core of good-natured humor, however, that good family movies should have. An added bonus is the movie’s wonderful, crisp color photography and quick editing, which may be the best of all the recent movies that World Wide Pictures has done with Dean River Productions.

Julie Condra is a real find as the movie’s sinful heroine, who eventually finds redemption with Christ by the time the movie arrives at that fishing hole in Redemption, Mont. She gets into the comical spirit of things early and makes an easy transition to the emotional, heart-tugging scenes with the grandfather. Pat Hingle as the grandfather provides, of course, the steady, firm and gentle hand required for his central role as the one who brings the straying sheep back into the fold of Christ. Leo Rossi as the mob boss, Jay Underwood as Alan the boyfriend, Tony Longo as Vincent, and Wes Studi as a professional “tracker” who wastes no time locating Amanda make perfect comic foils. One of the highlights of the movie is watching Vincent and Alan share their unexpected enthusiasm for the music of David Cassidy and the Partridge Family. The movie is worth seeing for those scenes alone, not to mention its redemptive Christian worldview.

Finally, ROAD TO REDEMPTION also cleverly introduces the Gospel of Jesus Christ by having the grandfather listen to his favorite radio show, the Billy Graham program, during the trip. Like the rest of the movie, it makes for an entertaining way to introduce people to the serious message of the Gospel. It’s a relevant message everyone should hear at least once in their journey along the Road of Life, a road that can be a ROAD TO REDEMPTION if only you open your mind and unlock your heart.

In Brief:

ROAD TO REDEMPTION is a lively, funny Christian comedy from World Wide Pictures, the movie ministry of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association. It opens in February and March in select cities. The movie tells the comical story of Amanda, a spoiled young woman who gets in trouble after she and her boyfriend take money from her boss, a gangster. Amanda turns to her wealthy grandfather, a witty, kind, compassionate man with a weak heart and a strong faith in Jesus Christ. He agrees to give her the money to pay her debt, but only if she travels with him to his favorite fishing hole in Redemption, Mont., where they spent time when she was a little girl many years ago. Of course, her boss and his henchman have dragged her boyfriend into the search for her. Now, they’re hot on her trail.

ROAD TO REDEMPTION is a fast-paced comedy with wholesome values. An added bonus is the movie’s wonderful, crisp color photography, quick editing and strong, frequently comical, performances. ROAD TO REDEMPTION is an entertaining way to introduce people to the serious message of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. It deserves the Church’s full support