RUBY

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 27, 1992

Starring: Danny Aiello, Sherilyn Fenn,
Arliss Howard, Tobin Bell,
Willie Garson, & Marc
Lawrence.

Genre: Low-Ironic Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: Approx. 110 min.

Distributor: Triumph Releasing/Manifesto
Films

Director: John Mackenzie

Executive Producer:

Producer: Stephen Davis

Writer: Sigurton Sighvatsson & Steve
Ogling

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Content:

(LLL, VV, S, N, M) Approximately 35 obscenities and 2 profanities; man shot in forehead, prolonged view of gangland murder victim, graphic re-enactment of John F. Kennedy's assassination, re-enactment of Lee Harvey Oswald's assassination similar to news footage, & one fist fight; sexual immorality implied; partial nudity in striptease acts; and, frequent alcohol consumption.

Summary:

Following JFK comes RUBY, about Jack Ruby, the infamous Dallas burlesque joint owner who shot Lee Harvey Oswald. Although RUBY does a good job of establishing Ruby's low ironic point of view, and RUBY's premise of a Mafia plot on Kennedy's life seems more plausible than Oliver Stone's implication of almost the entire U.S. government, its language, violence and striptease gyrations override its contribution to illuminating the infamous weekend in Dallas.

Review:

Following JFK comes RUBY, about Jack Ruby, the infamous Dallas burlesque joint owner who shot Lee Harvey Oswald. As the movie opens, President Kennedy's crusade against the Mafia has pushed them up against the wall. In Cuba, Castro has also hit hard, so the mob sends Ruby to bring back aging kingpin Santos, whom Castro jailed. After foiling a murder attempt on Santos (which annoys the CIA), Ruby is drawn into the Mafia's web. At the same time, the bosses take advantage of Ruby's star, Candy Cane, by planting her in JFK's bed. Ruby slowly realizes that the mob has cut him out, so he kills Oswald to provoke an investigation which will give him the chance to tell what "really" happened. Instead, he has to either plead insanity, or he goes to death row. He pleads insanity and from then on no one takes him seriously. So, he languishes in custody until his death in 1967.

RUBY does a good job of establishing Ruby's low ironic point of view. Also, RUBY's premise of a Mafia plot on Kennedy's life seems more plausible than Oliver Stone's implication of almost the entire U.S. government. However, the language, violence and striptease gyrations override this film's contribution to illuminating the infamous weekend in Dallas.

In Brief: