RUSH HOUR 2

Bumper-To-Bumper Comic Thrills

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 03, 2001

Starring: Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker,
John Lone, Roselyn Sanchez,
Ziyi Zhang, Alan King, & Don
Cheadle

Genre: Action Comedy

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema/Warner Bros.

Director: Brett Ratner

Executive Producer: Andrew Z. Davis

Producer: Roger Birnbaum, Arthur
Sarkissian, Jonathan Glickman,
& Jay Stern

Writer: Jeff Nathanson & Ross LaManna

Address Comments To:

Robert Shaye, CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811

Content:

(B, Pa, PC, Ho, LLL, VV, S, N, A, D, M) Moral worldview about two police detectives, one Chinese & one African-American, who team up to fight an international smuggling ring, plus some pagan immoral elements, one politically correct statement & one minor homosexual character appears gratuitously in the movie; 48 obscenities, 2 profanities, one hero exclaims, “Lord Jesus, I don’t want to die!” & “Oh, my Lord!” & character mentions that gang will cut off man’s “egg roll”; much of the action violence, including plenty of martial arts fighting, is played for comical effect &, other than two agents dying (unseen) in a bombing, only the villains die in this good-overcomes-evil story; many light sexual references & humor including some voyeurism as woman undresses in hotel room; brief rear male nudity shown during scenes in a Japanese massage parlor with scantily clad women & woman in underwear; drinking; smoking; and, revenge motif & gambling not fully rebuked but theft, gangsterism, counterfeiting, & lying rebuked.

Summary:

RUSH HOUR 2 reunites Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker for a fast-paced, action-packed martial arts comedy. Thankfully, Tucker’s mouth and Chan’s fists each fly faster and tighter than in the original RUSH HOUR, but the movie’s rice paper-thin plot includes many light sexual references.

Review:

RUSH HOUR 2 reunites Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker for this fast-paced, action-packed, don’t-let-the-public-realize-there’s-little-plot-here martial arts comedy. It’s been two years since the first RUSH HOUR, but the story picks up just one week later and opens in Hong Kong. Thankfully, Tucker’s mouth and Chan’s fists each fly faster and tighter than in the original comedy.

LAPD Detective Carter (Tucker) is anxious to begin his vacation and party with Chinese women, but Inspector Lee (Chan) is still on the job and is asked to investigate a U.S. Embassy bombing. His boss believes one of the fearful Chinese gangs known as the Triads is involved and decides Lee should be sent in to handle it.

Lee confronts Ricky Tan (John Lone), the leader of the local Triad gang, and is distracted by a mysterious and sadistic female gang member. Lee explains to Carter that Ricky Tan is an ex-Chinese cop who killed Lee’s father, also a cop, while he was investigating an unsolved case. They agree to solve the case so they can enjoy their vacation together.

Lee and Carter discover the Triad is operating an international smuggling ring. An undercover Secret Service agent asks them to help her locate very important stolen U.S. minting plates. After several amusing incidents, they travel from Hong Kong to Los Angeles, then they are shanghaied to Las Vegas for a rushed yet amusing ending. There, the dazzling duo discover the real villains and cleverly fight their way through a crowded casino.

RUSH HOUR 2 steers to avoid stalls and heavy delays in the storyline. Lee and Carter chase, flee, fight, and deliver very funny lines. Then, the pesky plot resurfaces, and it’s time to have them chase, flee, fight, and laugh again. The audience, sufficiently distracted, will be entertained. What works best are the comical action scenes and the Odd Couple relationship between Lee and Carter, which the movie plays for all that it’s worth. All the silly villains and plot turns are just flimsy excuses to bring these likable characters back to the summer Cineplex.

What doesn’t work so well is Carter’s lascivious obsession with beautiful females. Consequently, MOVIEGUIDE® recommends caution for teenagers, especially younger ones and teenagers struggling with sexual issues.

Despite its rice paper-thin plot, RUSH HOUR 2 manages to deliver bumper-to-bumper comic thrills for older audiences. New Line Cinema, which is owned by Warner Bros., has developed a popular franchise with this movie. If they can inject the series with some variety, and more family-friendly, Christian values, they can ensure increased success.

In Brief:

RUSH HOUR 2 reunites Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker for this fast-paced, action-packed martial arts comedy. The movie opens in Hong Kong, where LAPD Detective Carter (Tucker) is anxious to begin his vacation and party with Chinese women, but Inspector Lee (Chan) is still on the job and is asked to investigate a U.S. Embassy bombing. Lee’s boss believes the leader of a Chinese criminal gang, and the former police partner of Lee’s dead father, is involved. After several amusing incidents, Lee and Carter travel from Hong Kong to Los Angeles, then they are shanghaied to Las Vegas for a rushed yet amusing ending full of comical and not-so-comical action violence.

RUSH HOUR 2 steers to avoid stalls and heavy delays in the storyline. Thankfully, Tucker’s mouth and Chan’s fists each fly faster and tighter than in the original comedy. What works best are the comical action scenes and the Odd Couple relationship between Lee and Carter, which the movie plays for all that it’s worth. What doesn’t work so well is Carter’s lascivious obsession with beautiful females. Consequently, MOVIEGUIDE® recommends caution for teenagers, especially younger ones and teenagers struggling with sexual issues.