SAFE PASSAGE

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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
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Release Date: December 25, 1994

Starring: Susan Sarandon, Sam Shepard,
Robert Sean Leonard, Nick
Stahl, Jason London, Marcia
Gay Harden, Matt Keeslar,
Philip Bosco, Philip Arthur
Ross, & Steven Robert Ross

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Robert Allan
Ackerman EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS:
David Gale, Betsy Beers & Ruth
Vitale

Executive Producer:

Producer: Gale Anne Hurd

Writer: Deena Goldstone BASED ON THE
NOVEL BY: Ellyn Bache

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Summary:

SAFE PASSAGE is an intelligently poignant movie about a family awaiting news of a loved one in crisis overseas, which sells itself as a genuine family drama -- a look into the way a crisis puts the whole of a family's life together into relief, and it delivers in a refreshingly unaffected way. Susan Sarandon stars as the concerned wife and mother in this movie that affirms the process of living and loving rather than focusing on the pathos of untimely death and grief.

Review:

SAFE PASSAGE is an intelligently poignant movie about a family awaiting news of a loved one in crisis overseas, which sells itself as a genuine family drama -- a look into the way a crisis puts the whole of a family's life together into relief, and it delivers in a refreshingly unaffected way. Susan Sarandon stars as the concerned wife and mother in this movie that affirms the process of living and loving rather than focusing on the pathos of untimely death and grief.

The movie is, in fact, a salute to all women who have poured themselves out for their children. However, it also has the courage to communicate the impossibility of doing all things well for every child at every moment. In its faithfulness to life, SAFE PASSAGE does not shy away from the intense vulnerability a mother experiences by investing her heart in a child who may grow up not to appreciate or love her, and its complete honesty is its great strength. Unpretentious in dialogue and believable in structure, the movie's overall effect is quite moving. Filmmakers Ackerman and Hurd assemble a cast who artfully bring their characters to life, and the texture and colors of the film generate the warmth of home. Although many themes are mature, the issues are handled well. The movie's most profound insight just might be that the art of parenting may always be complex, but is never completely ambiguous.

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