STEP UP 3D

Fancy Dance Moves in 3-D

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 06, 2010

Starring: Sharni Vinson, Rick Malambri,
Adam Sevanik, and Alyson
Stoner

Genre: Musical Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Touchstone Pictures/Walt
Disney Company

Director: Jon Chu

Executive Producer: Amy Herman

Producer: Erik Feig, Jennifer Gibgot,
Adam Shankman, and Patrick
Wachsberger

Writer: Amy Andelson, Emily Meyer,
Jessie Nelson

Address Comments To:

Robert Iger, President/CEO, The Walt Disney Company
(Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone Pictures, Hollywood Pictures, Miramax Films, and Buena Vista Distribution)
Rich Ross, Chairman, Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000
Website: www.disney.com

Content:

(BB, L, V, N, M) Strong moral worldview extolling honesty and integrity; five to seven obscenities and profanities; two scenes of implied violence when rival dance troops attempt to be the top dancers in a very competitive, domineering way; no sexual content but some minor kissing; upper male nudity in dance scenes and exposed midriffs on most of the young women; no alcohol; no smoking or drugs; betrayal, character steals dance routines of a competitor, and very dysfunctional family portrayals in that those with money are left to live alone with no moral guidance and many of the teenagers live together without parents but make their own family instead.

Summary:

STEP UP 3-D is an entertaining movie where two rival dance teams in New York City must ultimately come together to face off in an epic dance battle. The production values are high and some moral values are extolled, but there is brief foul language, so caution is advised for children.

Review:

Set in New York City, STEP UP 3-D is an entertaining dance movie with some morally uplifting values.



In the story, a young man named Moose has sworn off his dancing skills for an engineering degree at NYU. He soon gets into the street-dancing scene in the city. While training with a dance troop, Moose rediscovers his passion for dancing. The troop’s leader, Luke, finds dancers from broken families and lets them live with him.

The troop needs to win an important dance competition in order to keep the house from being foreclosed. One of the newer female members, however, has been stealing routines to give to her brother, who is actually Luke's rival, former best friend and leader of their main competition. Meanwhile, Moose struggles with keeping up his grades as he gets involved in dance training and the troop’s competition.

STEP UP 3-D has enough villains and drama to keep viewers interested in the plot. There is also plenty of romance, dancing and plot twists to keep the story moving. The 3D effects are done very well. The movie is also morally uplifting – honesty prevails and is ultimately rewarded.

There is some brief foul language, however, so caution is advised.

In Brief:

In STEP UP 3-D, a young man named Moose has sworn off his dancing skills for an engineering degree at NYU. He soon gets into the street-dancing scene in the city. While training with a dance troop, Moose rediscovers his passion for dancing. The troop’s leader, Luke, finds dancers from broken families and lets them live with him. The troop needs to win an important dance competition in order to keep the house from being foreclosed. One of the newer female members, however, has been stealing routines to give to her brother, the leader of their main rival team. The brother also is Luke's former best friend. Meanwhile, Moose struggles with keeping up his grades as he gets involved in dance training and the dance competition.

STEP UP 3-D has enough villains and drama to keep viewers interested in the plot. There is also plenty of romance, dancing and plot twists to keep the story moving. The 3-D effects are done very well. The movie is morally uplifting. Honesty prevails and is ultimately rewarded. There is some brief foul language, however, so caution for pre-teenage children is advised.