THE CHORUS (LES CHORISTES)

Changing Lives Through Music

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 22, 2004

Starring: Gérard Jugnot, François
Berléand, Jean-Baptiste
Maunier, and Marie Bunel

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 91 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Films/Buena Vista/Walt
Disney Company

Director: Christophe Barratier

Executive Producer:

Producer: Arthur Cohn and Jacques Perrin

Writer: Christophe Barratier and
Philippe Lopes-Curval

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
Miramax Films
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (323) 822-4100 and (212) 941-3800
Fax: (212) 941-3846
Website: www.miramax.com

Content:

(HH, BB, L, V, S, D, M) Humanist worldview in which only people can make people happy, with strong moral overtones that encourage understanding, patience, care for children, and adoption; eight obscenities; brief violence with glass breaking and falling into man’s eye, disobedient children kept in cell-like room, and principal slaps disobedient student; no sex scenes but some sexual references; no nudity; no alcohol; underage smoking; and, cruel disciplinary tactics rebuked, children misbehave and stealing.

Summary:

THE CHOURS is a French movie that takes place in a Dickens-like boarding school for young delinquents in the 1940s. THE CHORUS is nowhere near perfect, but it is a nice tale of compassion and reaching out to the unfortunate and disaffected, though there there is a smattering of foul language and a worldview that says only human fellowship can make people happy.

Review:

A French movie, THE CHORUS takes place in a Dickens-like boarding school for young delinquents in the 1940s. Teachers in the school shout at students and send the bad ones to a damp, windowless cell.

A down-on-his-luck music composer applies for a job at the school as a last resort. His outsider’s perspective brings the humanity and care to the children that they need and desire. The new teacher forms a choir and shows the students how to sing. Their activity curtails many of the discipline problems and gives them a newfound sense of accomplishment. Not only a call for compassion, this movie is also a demonstration of the power of art.

Good acting makes THE CHORUS engaging. Especially excellent are Gérard Jugnot, who plays the teacher and composer, and the young actor Jean-Baptiste Maunier. Reportedly, the children in the film performed all of their own singing, and those scenes are impressive. Note, however, that the choir sings only secular songs.

Admittedly, casting music as the balm that soothes the students’ lives is clichéd, but the warm, happy ending makes up for this. THE CHORUS is nowhere near perfect, but it is a nice tale of compassion and reaching out to the unfortunate and disaffected. It contains, however, a smattering of foul language and a humanist worldview that says only human fellowship can make people happy.

In Brief:

THE CHOURS is a French movie that takes place in a Dickens-like boarding school for young delinquents in the 1940s. Teachers shout at students and send the bad ones to a damp, windowless cell. A down-on-his-luck music composer applies for a job at the school as a last resort. His outsider’s perspective brings humanity and care to the children, which they need and desire. The new teacher forms a choir and shows the students how to sing. Their activity curtails many of the discipline problems and gives them a sense of accomplishment. A call for compassion, this movie also demonstrates the power of art.

Good acting makes THE CHORUS engaging. Reportedly, the children performed all of their own singing, and those scenes are impressive. Please note that the choir sings only secular songs. Admittedly, music as the balm that soothes the students’ lives is clichéd, but the happy ending makes up for this. THE CHORUS is not perfect, but it is a nice tale of compassion and reaching out to the unfortunate and disaffected. It contains, however, a smattering of foul language and a worldview that says only human fellowship can make people happy.